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Title: The deep Madden Field, a super-deep Madison gas reservoir, Wind River Basin, Wyoming

Abstract

Madison dolomites form the reservoir of a super deep, potential giant sour gas field developed on the Madden Anticline immediately in front of the Owl Creek Thrust along the northern rim of the Wind River Basin, central Wyoming. The Madison reservoir dolomites are presently buried to some 25,000 feet at Madden Field and exhibit porosity in excess of 15%. An equivalent dolomitized Madison sequence is exposed in outcrop only 5 miles to the north on the hanging wall of the Owl Creek thrust at Lysite Mountain. Preliminary comparative stratigraphic, geochemical and petrologic data, between outcrop and available cores and logs at Deep Madden suggests: (1) early, sea level-controlled, evaporite-related dolomitization of the reservoir and outcrop prior to significant burial; (2) both outcrop and deep reservoir dolomites underwent significant recrystallization during a common burial history until their connection was severed during Laramide faulting in the Eocene; (3) While the dolomite reservoir at Madden suffered additional diagenesis during an additional 7-10 thousand feet of burial, the pore systems between outcrop and deep reservoir are remarkably similar. The two existing deep Madison wells at Madden are on stream, with a third deep Madison well currently drilling. The sequence stratigraphic framework and the diageneticmore » history of the Madison strongly suggests that outcrops and surface cores of the Madison in the Owl Creek Mountains will be useful in further development and detailed reservoir modeling of the Madden Deep Field.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)
  2. Louisiana Land and Exploration, Denver, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
425749
Report Number(s):
CONF-960527-
TRN: 96:004994-0387
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Annual convention of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, Inc. and the Society for Sedimentary Geology: global exploration and geotechnology, San Diego, CA (United States), 19-22 May 1996; Other Information: PBD: 1996; Related Information: Is Part Of 1996 AAPG annual convention. Volume 5; PB: 231 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; WYOMING; NATURAL GAS FIELDS; STRATIGRAPHY; PETROLEUM DEPOSITS; NATURAL GAS; EXPLORATION; PRODUCTION; RESERVOIR ROCK; GEOLOGIC MODELS

Citation Formats

Moore, C.H., and Hawkins, C. The deep Madden Field, a super-deep Madison gas reservoir, Wind River Basin, Wyoming. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Moore, C.H., & Hawkins, C. The deep Madden Field, a super-deep Madison gas reservoir, Wind River Basin, Wyoming. United States.
Moore, C.H., and Hawkins, C. 1996. "The deep Madden Field, a super-deep Madison gas reservoir, Wind River Basin, Wyoming". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_425749,
title = {The deep Madden Field, a super-deep Madison gas reservoir, Wind River Basin, Wyoming},
author = {Moore, C.H. and Hawkins, C.},
abstractNote = {Madison dolomites form the reservoir of a super deep, potential giant sour gas field developed on the Madden Anticline immediately in front of the Owl Creek Thrust along the northern rim of the Wind River Basin, central Wyoming. The Madison reservoir dolomites are presently buried to some 25,000 feet at Madden Field and exhibit porosity in excess of 15%. An equivalent dolomitized Madison sequence is exposed in outcrop only 5 miles to the north on the hanging wall of the Owl Creek thrust at Lysite Mountain. Preliminary comparative stratigraphic, geochemical and petrologic data, between outcrop and available cores and logs at Deep Madden suggests: (1) early, sea level-controlled, evaporite-related dolomitization of the reservoir and outcrop prior to significant burial; (2) both outcrop and deep reservoir dolomites underwent significant recrystallization during a common burial history until their connection was severed during Laramide faulting in the Eocene; (3) While the dolomite reservoir at Madden suffered additional diagenesis during an additional 7-10 thousand feet of burial, the pore systems between outcrop and deep reservoir are remarkably similar. The two existing deep Madison wells at Madden are on stream, with a third deep Madison well currently drilling. The sequence stratigraphic framework and the diagenetic history of the Madison strongly suggests that outcrops and surface cores of the Madison in the Owl Creek Mountains will be useful in further development and detailed reservoir modeling of the Madden Deep Field.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1996,
month =
}

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  • Madison dolomites form the reservoir of a super deep, potential giant sour gas field developed on the Madden Anticline immediately in front of the Owl Creek Thrust along the northern rim of the Wind River Basin, central Wyoming. The Madison reservoir dolomites are presently buried to some 25,000 feet at Madden Field and exhibit porosity in excess of 15%. An equivalent dolomitized Madison sequence is exposed in outcrop only 5 miles to the north on the hanging wall of the Owl Creek thrust at Lysite Mountain. Preliminary comparative stratigraphic, geochemical and petrologic data, between outcrop and available cores and logsmore » at Deep Madden suggests: (1) early, sea level-controlled, evaporite-related dolomitization of the reservoir and outcrop prior to significant burial; (2) both outcrop and deep reservoir dolomites underwent significant recrystallization during a common burial history until their connection was severed during Laramide faulting in the Eocene; (3) While the dolomite reservoir at Madden suffered additional diagenesis during an additional 7-10 thousand feet of burial, the pore systems between outcrop and deep reservoir are remarkably similar. The two existing deep Madison wells at Madden are on stream, with a third deep Madison well currently drilling. The sequence stratigraphic framework and the diagenetic history of the Madison strongly suggests that outcrops and surface cores of the Madison in the Owl Creek Mountains will be useful in further development and detailed reservoir modeling of the Madden Deep Field.« less
  • Second-generation computer models of thermal maturation of coal and carbonaceous rock indicate that active gas generation markedly decreases with moderate temperature decrease. These models predict that the overpressured gas reservoirs of the Madden Anticline cannot be maintained by ongoing active generation. This paper proposes natural desorption of gas from exhumed coal and carbonaceous rock as one cause of continued overpressuring after significant cooling in eroding basins.
  • The Madden Deep unit, located in the Wind River basin of central Wyoming, has been a source of natural gas production from Upper Cretaceous and Lower Tertiary formations. Drilling in excess of 24,000 ft occurred during the mid-1980s and early 1990s to explore for and develop Paleozoic gas potential. These well bores penetrated the Upper Cretaceous Frontier Formation at depths below 20,000 ft. Open-hole logs, cores, and drilling cuttings suggest a significant gas accumulation within the Frontier. The Frontier Formation represents a series of coarsening-upward, shallow-marine sequences deposited as a seaward-stepping system along the Western Cretaceous Seaway margin. In Maddenmore » field, the fifth bench of the Frontier contains traditional facies from foreshore/beach, to upper and lower shoreface, to offshore regimes. Common to deposites elsewhere, the best reservoirs are found in the foreshore/beach settings at the top of the bench. Production is not related to easily understood porosity regimes; primary intergranular porosity is virtually nonexistent. An overpressured reservoir with numerous vertical/subvertical fractures accounts for production. Microfractures and megafractures, up to 10 mm across, provide permeabilities that exceed 1 d. Fractures are partly filled by abundant quartz and minor calcite. Mineralization would allow singificant reservoir pressure drawdown without reducing aperture width. Major fractures apparently strike west-northwest, and such orientation data may permit a horizontal drilling venture when technology is capable of surviving such deep, overpressured, and high-temperature environments.« less
  • Petrologic and sedimentologic heterogeneity in the Sussex Sandstone Member of the Upper Cretaceous Cody Shale in the House Creek field affects recovery of oil through a decrease in sandstone porosity and permeability and by causing isolation and compartmentalization of reservoir facies. The Sussex is an upward-coarsening bed of inter-ridge to central-ridge facies of a marine-ridge sandstone sequence. Oil is produced from fine- to medium-grained, porous, and mainly trough cross-bedded central-ridge and ridge-margin sandstones. Underlying and interbedded inter-ridge sandstones have low porosity and permeability and are laterally continuous, thinly-bedded, and generally tabular. Megascopic heterogeneity includes (1) compartmentalization of the lensate reservoirmore » sandstones by interbedding with inter-ridge sandstones, (2) facies-related upward-increasing porosity and permeability in the marine-ridge sequence, and (3) bedform-related permeability boundaries that result from soft-sediment deformation of glauconite concentrated in trough cross-bedding laminae sets. Petrologic heterogeneities result mainly from highly variable distributions and amounts of cements and clays. Nonproductive inter-ridge and ridge-facies sandstones contain generally equivalent amounts of quartz cement (8% average) and greater amounts of calcite cement (12% average) and pore-occluding clays (14% average) than oil-productive sandstones. Reservoir sandstones contain averages of 9% carbonate cement and 10% clays, but the most productive and porous intervals are cemented by quartz (8% average) with negligible calcite. Average thin-section intergranular porosity is 7% in oil-productive and 4% in nonproductive sandstones.« less
  • To date, over 74 million bbl of oil have been produced from stratigraphic traps at Hilight field. Production is primarily from thin but stratigraphically complex fluvial and shallow marine sandstone of the Lower Cretaceous Muddy Sandstone. The deposition and preservation of these reservoirs were controlled by the interplay between sea level and tectonics. The Muddy Sandstone in Hilight field was deposited during a late Albian sea level rise. It onlaps an erosional surface, developed during the preceding sea level drop, including a dendritic valley system cut deeply into the underlying Skull Creek Shale. In this area, the Muddy consists ofmore » four members that are bounded by transgressive disconformities. These members were deposited during stillstands in the overall rise of sea level. The lower two members consist of fluvial and fluvial-estuarine deposits which fill the valley system; the upper two members consist of fluvial-deltaic and barrier island deposits. Three northeast-trending lineaments transect Hilight field. These lineaments are interpreted to represent basement faults that experienced recurrent movement during Muddy deposition. Relative structural downdrop controlled the orientation of drainages that cut the Hilight valley system. Recurrent movement provided structural and topographic lows within which relatively thick fluvial-deltaic and barrier island sandstones were deposited and preserved. Thinner sequences were deposited and subsequently eroded on adjacent structural and topographic highs.« less