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Title: DIFFUSION OF INTERSTITIAL SOLUTES IN THE GROUP V TRANSITION METALS

Abstract

Mechanical relaxation measurements are used extensively to obtain information on the diffusion rate of interstitial solute atoms in body-centered cubic metals. Such studies were stimulated by a model, developed by J. L. Snoek, which yielded a relationship between a relaxation time, an experimental parameter, and the diffusion coefficient of the solute atom. Although Snoek's model was confirmed very well for solid solutions of carbon or nitrogen in alpha -iroii, a number of anomalies were observed when relaxation studies were extended to the group V transition metals. An extensive experimental study was made of the factors that influence relaxation times. The anomalous behavior of the group VA metals can be accommodated within the framework of Snoek's model by taking account of the specific nature of solid solutions based on these metals. Diffusion data obtained by a varicty of relaxation techniques are presented for oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon iri vanadium, niobium (columbium), and tantalum. These data are in agreement with those obtained by the inore conventional concentration gradient techniques in the few instances where such information is available. The pattern of activation energies suggest that lattice strain consideratiors alone are insuffieient to explain the activation process involved in interstitial diffusion. (auth)

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
General Electric Research Lab., Schenectady, N.Y.
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
4251422
NSA Number:
NSA-13-013613
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Applied Physics (U.S.)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: Vol: 30; Other Information: Orig. Receipt Date: 31-DEC-59
Country of Publication:
Country unknown/Code not available
Language:
English
Subject:
METALLURGY AND CERAMICS; ALLOTROPY; ATOMS; CARBON; DEFECTS; DIFFUSION; INTERSTITIAL ATOMS; IRON; IRON-ALPHA; LATTICES; MECHANICAL PROPERTIES; NIOBIUM; NITROGEN; OXYGEN; REACTION KINETICS; SOLID SOLUTIONS; TANTALUM; TRANSITION METALS; VANADIUM

Citation Formats

Powers, R W, and Doyle, M V. DIFFUSION OF INTERSTITIAL SOLUTES IN THE GROUP V TRANSITION METALS. Country unknown/Code not available: N. p., 1959. Web. doi:10.1063/1.1702398.
Powers, R W, & Doyle, M V. DIFFUSION OF INTERSTITIAL SOLUTES IN THE GROUP V TRANSITION METALS. Country unknown/Code not available. doi:10.1063/1.1702398.
Powers, R W, and Doyle, M V. Wed . "DIFFUSION OF INTERSTITIAL SOLUTES IN THE GROUP V TRANSITION METALS". Country unknown/Code not available. doi:10.1063/1.1702398.
@article{osti_4251422,
title = {DIFFUSION OF INTERSTITIAL SOLUTES IN THE GROUP V TRANSITION METALS},
author = {Powers, R W and Doyle, M V},
abstractNote = {Mechanical relaxation measurements are used extensively to obtain information on the diffusion rate of interstitial solute atoms in body-centered cubic metals. Such studies were stimulated by a model, developed by J. L. Snoek, which yielded a relationship between a relaxation time, an experimental parameter, and the diffusion coefficient of the solute atom. Although Snoek's model was confirmed very well for solid solutions of carbon or nitrogen in alpha -iroii, a number of anomalies were observed when relaxation studies were extended to the group V transition metals. An extensive experimental study was made of the factors that influence relaxation times. The anomalous behavior of the group VA metals can be accommodated within the framework of Snoek's model by taking account of the specific nature of solid solutions based on these metals. Diffusion data obtained by a varicty of relaxation techniques are presented for oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon iri vanadium, niobium (columbium), and tantalum. These data are in agreement with those obtained by the inore conventional concentration gradient techniques in the few instances where such information is available. The pattern of activation energies suggest that lattice strain consideratiors alone are insuffieient to explain the activation process involved in interstitial diffusion. (auth)},
doi = {10.1063/1.1702398},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics (U.S.)},
number = ,
volume = Vol: 30,
place = {Country unknown/Code not available},
year = {1959},
month = {4}
}