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Title: CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS FOR VARIOUS HEAD-END PROCESSES FOR THE AQUEOUS REPROCESSING OF SPENT FUEL ELEMENTS

Abstract

Materials of construction were evaluated for use in critical areas of head-end processes for the aqueous reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel elements. The SulfexThorex, Darex-Thorex, Darex, Zirflex, and Zircex processes were considered. The effect of varying heat treatments on the resistance of the materials was also evaluated. Dissolution of unirradiated fuel pins was carried out in vessels of promising materials. The corrosion rate of Ni-o-nel was about 5 mils per month during actual fuel-pin dissolution by the Sulfex-Thorex process. Stabilization and heat treatment are necessary to prevent intergranular attack at welds. Carpenter 20 Cb is subject to stress-corrosion cracking by the Sulfex decladding solution and Illium R behaves similarly to Ni-o-nel in Thorex solutions. Titanium shows promise as a construction material for a Darex-Thorex dissolver. However, several questions remain concerning a vapor-phase attack observed around certain weldments. Carpenter 20 Cb, Ni-o-nel, and Types 309 and 309S Cb stainless steel appeared worthy of further study for the Zirflex dissolver. Preliminary evaluations show that at least Ni-o-nel and Carpenter 20 Cb should be studied further as possible construction materials for a single vessel for Zirflex and Sulfex-Thorex processes. Illium R, Hastellcy C, and nickel were not attacked by hydrcchlorination conditions of themore » Zircex process. Minor attack was found on Inconel and Type S-816 alloy. The corrosion of titanium was negligible in the Darex dissolver and feed-adjustment system. The use of Type 304 ELC stainless steel lines for transterring Darex dissolver solution is not recommended. No corrosion of Type 347 stainless steel was observed after exposure for 2 years to chloride-contaminated Parex extraction systems at room temperature. (auth)« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Battelle Memorial Inst., Columbus, Ohio
OSTI Identifier:
4236456
Report Number(s):
BMI-1375
NSA Number:
NSA-14-002453
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-26, SUBCONTRACT NO. 988
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: For Oak Ridge National Lab. Orig. Receipt Date: 31-DEC-60
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
CHEMISTRY; BUILDING MATERIALS; CHLORIDES; CHROMIUM ALLOYS; CONTAMINATION; COPPER ALLOYS; CORROSION; DAREX PROCESS; FUEL ELEMENTS; HEAT TREATMENTS; MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS; NICKEL ALLOYS; PUREX PROCESS; REPROCESSING; SOLUTIONS; STAINLESS STEELS; SULFEX PROCESS; THOREX PROCESS; TITANIUM; TITANIUM ALLOYS; VAPORS; VESSELS; WATER; ZIRFLEX PROCESS

Citation Formats

Peterson, C.L., Miller, P.D., Jackson, J.D., and Fink, F.W. CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS FOR VARIOUS HEAD-END PROCESSES FOR THE AQUEOUS REPROCESSING OF SPENT FUEL ELEMENTS. United States: N. p., 1959. Web. doi:10.2172/4236456.
Peterson, C.L., Miller, P.D., Jackson, J.D., & Fink, F.W. CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS FOR VARIOUS HEAD-END PROCESSES FOR THE AQUEOUS REPROCESSING OF SPENT FUEL ELEMENTS. United States. doi:10.2172/4236456.
Peterson, C.L., Miller, P.D., Jackson, J.D., and Fink, F.W. Fri . "CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS FOR VARIOUS HEAD-END PROCESSES FOR THE AQUEOUS REPROCESSING OF SPENT FUEL ELEMENTS". United States. doi:10.2172/4236456. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/4236456.
@article{osti_4236456,
title = {CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS FOR VARIOUS HEAD-END PROCESSES FOR THE AQUEOUS REPROCESSING OF SPENT FUEL ELEMENTS},
author = {Peterson, C.L. and Miller, P.D. and Jackson, J.D. and Fink, F.W.},
abstractNote = {Materials of construction were evaluated for use in critical areas of head-end processes for the aqueous reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel elements. The SulfexThorex, Darex-Thorex, Darex, Zirflex, and Zircex processes were considered. The effect of varying heat treatments on the resistance of the materials was also evaluated. Dissolution of unirradiated fuel pins was carried out in vessels of promising materials. The corrosion rate of Ni-o-nel was about 5 mils per month during actual fuel-pin dissolution by the Sulfex-Thorex process. Stabilization and heat treatment are necessary to prevent intergranular attack at welds. Carpenter 20 Cb is subject to stress-corrosion cracking by the Sulfex decladding solution and Illium R behaves similarly to Ni-o-nel in Thorex solutions. Titanium shows promise as a construction material for a Darex-Thorex dissolver. However, several questions remain concerning a vapor-phase attack observed around certain weldments. Carpenter 20 Cb, Ni-o-nel, and Types 309 and 309S Cb stainless steel appeared worthy of further study for the Zirflex dissolver. Preliminary evaluations show that at least Ni-o-nel and Carpenter 20 Cb should be studied further as possible construction materials for a single vessel for Zirflex and Sulfex-Thorex processes. Illium R, Hastellcy C, and nickel were not attacked by hydrcchlorination conditions of the Zircex process. Minor attack was found on Inconel and Type S-816 alloy. The corrosion of titanium was negligible in the Darex dissolver and feed-adjustment system. The use of Type 304 ELC stainless steel lines for transterring Darex dissolver solution is not recommended. No corrosion of Type 347 stainless steel was observed after exposure for 2 years to chloride-contaminated Parex extraction systems at room temperature. (auth)},
doi = {10.2172/4236456},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1959},
month = {8}
}