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Title: CORROSION OF STAINLESS ALLOYS IN HIGH-TEMPERATURE NITROGENOUS ENVIRONMENTS

Abstract

On the basis of screening tests and favorable mechanical propenties, AISI Type 318 stainless steel was selected as a fuel-element cladding material to operate in c coolant comprised essentially of gaseous nitrogen modified by the addition of oxygen and water vapor. Tests at atmospheric pressure confirmed calculations which indicated that small additions of oxygen to nitrogen would inhibit nitriding by the process of preferential oxidation. The tests at atmospheric pressure determined that the rate of oxidation of Type 318 stainless was generally at a minimum when 0.5 volume per cent oxygen was added to the nitrogen gas. Oxidation of this steel was more severe when additions of 0.1 and 5.0 volume per cent oxygen were made to the nitrogen The rate of oxidation was primarily temperature dependent, but was also influenced by time. Oxidation during exposure periods of less than 1000 hr appeared to proceed at a parabolic rate. On longer exposures, however, there wcre indications of more rapid attack. A maximum depth of attack of 2.9 mils was observed on Type 318 stainless which had been exposed at 1650 F for 3658 hr. Stress-corrosion studies indicated that unstressed and stressed specimens were attacked at about the same rate. Stressesmore » as high as 1800 psi were applied to the stressed specimens. These studies also indicated that the rate of attack increased with an increase in the grain size of the metal and with an increase in the water-vapor content of the gaseous environment. The effect of grain size and water vapor was not as apparent in the studies in which stress corrosion was not a variable. The results of high-pressure studies (200 psi) indicated that, on a qualitative basis, the rate of oxidation was not affected by pressure. (auth)« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Battelle Memorial Inst., Columbus, Ohio
OSTI Identifier:
4233203
Report Number(s):
BMI-1361
NSA Number:
NSA-13-019222
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-92
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Orig. Receipt Date: 31-DEC-59
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
METALLURGY AND CERAMICS; COOLANTS; CORROSION; ENVIRONMENT; FUEL CANS; GRAIN SIZE; HIGH TEMPERATURE; NITROGEN; OXIDATION; OXIDES; OXYGEN; PRESSURE; REACTION KINETICS; STAINLESS STEELS; STRESSES; TEMPERATURE; THICKNESS; VAPORS; WATER

Citation Formats

Keller, D.L. ed. CORROSION OF STAINLESS ALLOYS IN HIGH-TEMPERATURE NITROGENOUS ENVIRONMENTS. United States: N. p., 1959. Web. doi:10.2172/4233203.
Keller, D.L. ed. CORROSION OF STAINLESS ALLOYS IN HIGH-TEMPERATURE NITROGENOUS ENVIRONMENTS. United States. doi:10.2172/4233203.
Keller, D.L. ed. Tue . "CORROSION OF STAINLESS ALLOYS IN HIGH-TEMPERATURE NITROGENOUS ENVIRONMENTS". United States. doi:10.2172/4233203. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/4233203.
@article{osti_4233203,
title = {CORROSION OF STAINLESS ALLOYS IN HIGH-TEMPERATURE NITROGENOUS ENVIRONMENTS},
author = {Keller, D.L. ed.},
abstractNote = {On the basis of screening tests and favorable mechanical propenties, AISI Type 318 stainless steel was selected as a fuel-element cladding material to operate in c coolant comprised essentially of gaseous nitrogen modified by the addition of oxygen and water vapor. Tests at atmospheric pressure confirmed calculations which indicated that small additions of oxygen to nitrogen would inhibit nitriding by the process of preferential oxidation. The tests at atmospheric pressure determined that the rate of oxidation of Type 318 stainless was generally at a minimum when 0.5 volume per cent oxygen was added to the nitrogen gas. Oxidation of this steel was more severe when additions of 0.1 and 5.0 volume per cent oxygen were made to the nitrogen The rate of oxidation was primarily temperature dependent, but was also influenced by time. Oxidation during exposure periods of less than 1000 hr appeared to proceed at a parabolic rate. On longer exposures, however, there wcre indications of more rapid attack. A maximum depth of attack of 2.9 mils was observed on Type 318 stainless which had been exposed at 1650 F for 3658 hr. Stress-corrosion studies indicated that unstressed and stressed specimens were attacked at about the same rate. Stresses as high as 1800 psi were applied to the stressed specimens. These studies also indicated that the rate of attack increased with an increase in the grain size of the metal and with an increase in the water-vapor content of the gaseous environment. The effect of grain size and water vapor was not as apparent in the studies in which stress corrosion was not a variable. The results of high-pressure studies (200 psi) indicated that, on a qualitative basis, the rate of oxidation was not affected by pressure. (auth)},
doi = {10.2172/4233203},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1959},
month = {7}
}