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Title: RADIOACTIVE WATER POSES NEW PROBLEMS

Abstract

The problems causcd by water impurities in power reactors are reviewed. Although high-pressure conventional steam boilers require high-quality water, the standards for nuclear reactor systems are extraordinarily high by comparison. Adverse chemical reactions include the normal corrosion reactions between metal and water and between metal and dissolved oxygen; the dissociation of water by fast neutrons, producing oxygen which in turn increases corrosion; and radiation catalyzed reactions such as the synthesis of nitric acid from nitrogen and oxygen under the influence of neutron radiation. Corrosion products may go into solution or suspension. or may form deposits or scale on equipment. All forms are subject to radiation, and long-lived radioactive species can make the reactor compartment inaccessible. Deposits tnterfere with close-tolerance mechanisms such as throttling valves and control-rod drives. Deposits of corrosion products from stainless steel seriously affect heat transfer. Argon and xenon can be added with air dissolved in makeup water, causing added troubles. Argon is irradiated to argon-41. Xenon-135 has a large cross section for neutron capture, which reduces the multiplication factor sustaining the chain reaction in the reactor. (auth)

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Originating Research Org. not identified
OSTI Identifier:
4229814
NSA Number:
NSA-13-019749
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Power (U.S.) Formerly Steam Absorbed Engineer (Chicago) and Operating Engineer and Science Industry (Scranton) Title varies; Journal Volume: Vol: 102; Other Information: Orig. Receipt Date: 31-DEC-59
Country of Publication:
Country unknown/Code not available
Language:
English
Subject:
REACTORS; ARGON- BOILING- NUCLEAR REACTIONS- POISONING- POWER PLANTS- PRESSURE VESSELS- RADIOACTIVITY- REACTORS- SOLUTIONS- WATER- XENON; BOILING- CATALYSIS- CHEMICAL REACTIONS- NEUTRONS- NITRIC ACID- NITROGEN- OXYGEN- POWER PLANTS- PRESSURE VESSELS- RADIATION EFFECTS- REACTORS; BOILING- CONTAMINATION- CORROSION- POWER PLANTS- PRESSURE VESSELS- REACTORS- SCALP- SOLUTIONS- SUSPENSIONS; BOILING- CORROSION- DEPOSITS- HEAT TRANSFER- POWER PLANTS- PRESSURE VESSELS- REACTORS- - STAINLESS STEELS; BOILING- CORROSION- METALS- OXYGEN- POWER PLANTS- PRESSURE VESSELS- REACTORS- WATER; BOILING- DECOMPOSITION- FAST NEUTRONS

Citation Formats

Dickert, C.T., Hetherington, R., and Raines, C.F.. RADIOACTIVE WATER POSES NEW PROBLEMS. Country unknown/Code not available: N. p., 1958. Web.
Dickert, C.T., Hetherington, R., & Raines, C.F.. RADIOACTIVE WATER POSES NEW PROBLEMS. Country unknown/Code not available.
Dickert, C.T., Hetherington, R., and Raines, C.F.. Mon . "RADIOACTIVE WATER POSES NEW PROBLEMS". Country unknown/Code not available. doi:.
@article{osti_4229814,
title = {RADIOACTIVE WATER POSES NEW PROBLEMS},
author = {Dickert, C.T. and Hetherington, R. and Raines, C.F.},
abstractNote = {The problems causcd by water impurities in power reactors are reviewed. Although high-pressure conventional steam boilers require high-quality water, the standards for nuclear reactor systems are extraordinarily high by comparison. Adverse chemical reactions include the normal corrosion reactions between metal and water and between metal and dissolved oxygen; the dissociation of water by fast neutrons, producing oxygen which in turn increases corrosion; and radiation catalyzed reactions such as the synthesis of nitric acid from nitrogen and oxygen under the influence of neutron radiation. Corrosion products may go into solution or suspension. or may form deposits or scale on equipment. All forms are subject to radiation, and long-lived radioactive species can make the reactor compartment inaccessible. Deposits tnterfere with close-tolerance mechanisms such as throttling valves and control-rod drives. Deposits of corrosion products from stainless steel seriously affect heat transfer. Argon and xenon can be added with air dissolved in makeup water, causing added troubles. Argon is irradiated to argon-41. Xenon-135 has a large cross section for neutron capture, which reduces the multiplication factor sustaining the chain reaction in the reactor. (auth)},
doi = {},
journal = {Power (U.S.) Formerly Steam Absorbed Engineer (Chicago) and Operating Engineer and Science Industry (Scranton) Title varies},
number = ,
volume = Vol: 102,
place = {Country unknown/Code not available},
year = {Mon Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 1958},
month = {Mon Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 1958}
}
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