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Title: OXIDE FLUORINATION TOWER

Abstract

A 3-inch-diameter flame tower for the conversion of uranosic oxide to uranium hexafluoride with elemental fluorine was tested for possible use in the fluorination step of the present uranium recovery process. The oxide was fed from a hopper to the tower by a screw feeder. The fluorine and the oxide entered at the top and flowed concurrently down through the tower. The unreacted or partially reacted oxide was collected in an ash receiver at the bottom. Fine solid particles were removed from the gas stream by an electrostatic precipitator and a tune-type filter. The uranium hexafluoride was collected in cold traps. Twenty-five experimental runs were conducted with average oxide feed rates from 3.73 to 19.38 lb/hr. The average fluorine flow rates were from 7.5% below to 44% above the stoichiometric amount of fluorine required. The best operating conditions were at a feed rate of 15 lb of oxide per hour with a minimum fluorine excess of 75% 110.6 lb of fluorine per hr). The material collected in the tower ash receiver represented between 6.0 and 10.0 percent of the total amount of uranium fed during the run. The ash, combined with an equal weight of oxide, can be fed backmore » to the tower. The electrostatic precipitator wns capable of collecting up to 92% of the solids in the gas stream. A porous-tube filter worked best for the removal of the remaining particles in the gas stream. The experimental runs have shown that uranosic oxide can be satisfactorily converted to uranium hexafluoride in a 3-in.-diameter flame tower of simple design. The present conversion rate of uranosic oxide, approximately 4 lb per manhour with the tube reactor, could be increased to 10 lb per manhour by using the flame tower. (auth)« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Goodyear Atomic Corp., Portsmouth, Ohio
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
4225561
Report Number(s):
GAT-252
NSA Number:
NSA-14-000086
DOE Contract Number:  
AT(33-2)-1
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Orig. Receipt Date: 31-DEC-60
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
CHEMISTRY; CONVERSION; ELECTROSTATICS; FILTERS; FLUORINATION; FLUORINE; GASES; OXIDES; PARTICLES; PRECIPITATION; RECOVERY; SOLIDS; TRAPS; TUBES; URANIUM; URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE; URANIUM OXIDES

Citation Formats

Peoples, L.C. OXIDE FLUORINATION TOWER. United States: N. p., 1959. Web. doi:10.2172/4225561.
Peoples, L.C. OXIDE FLUORINATION TOWER. United States. doi:10.2172/4225561.
Peoples, L.C. Fri . "OXIDE FLUORINATION TOWER". United States. doi:10.2172/4225561. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/4225561.
@article{osti_4225561,
title = {OXIDE FLUORINATION TOWER},
author = {Peoples, L.C.},
abstractNote = {A 3-inch-diameter flame tower for the conversion of uranosic oxide to uranium hexafluoride with elemental fluorine was tested for possible use in the fluorination step of the present uranium recovery process. The oxide was fed from a hopper to the tower by a screw feeder. The fluorine and the oxide entered at the top and flowed concurrently down through the tower. The unreacted or partially reacted oxide was collected in an ash receiver at the bottom. Fine solid particles were removed from the gas stream by an electrostatic precipitator and a tune-type filter. The uranium hexafluoride was collected in cold traps. Twenty-five experimental runs were conducted with average oxide feed rates from 3.73 to 19.38 lb/hr. The average fluorine flow rates were from 7.5% below to 44% above the stoichiometric amount of fluorine required. The best operating conditions were at a feed rate of 15 lb of oxide per hour with a minimum fluorine excess of 75% 110.6 lb of fluorine per hr). The material collected in the tower ash receiver represented between 6.0 and 10.0 percent of the total amount of uranium fed during the run. The ash, combined with an equal weight of oxide, can be fed back to the tower. The electrostatic precipitator wns capable of collecting up to 92% of the solids in the gas stream. A porous-tube filter worked best for the removal of the remaining particles in the gas stream. The experimental runs have shown that uranosic oxide can be satisfactorily converted to uranium hexafluoride in a 3-in.-diameter flame tower of simple design. The present conversion rate of uranosic oxide, approximately 4 lb per manhour with the tube reactor, could be increased to 10 lb per manhour by using the flame tower. (auth)},
doi = {10.2172/4225561},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1959},
month = {8}
}