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Title: Open-grown crown radius of eleven bottomland hardwood species: Prediction and use in assessing stocking

Abstract

Equations were prepared to predict crown radius for eleven species of open-grown bottomland hardwood trees. Crown radius was predicted as a function of diameter at breast height (dbh) and as a function of dbh, total height, and crown ratio. Equations were prepared for individual species and species groups. Pecan has the largest crowns over a broad range of dbh. Eastern cottonwood has the smallest crowns for most levels of dbh. Sweetgum has relatively small crowns for trees of small dbh, but crown radius is comparable to most species at the largest dbh. The crown radius predictions may be used to calculate crown competition factor. B-lines of stocking may be calculated that represent a stand of one species as well as a mixed-species stand of any particular species proportion.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Forest Service, Stoneville, MS (United States). Southern Hardwoods Lab.
OSTI Identifier:
422102
Report Number(s):
PB-97-123152/XAB
TRN: 70031309
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: DN: Pub. in Southern Jnl. of Applied Forestry, Vol. 20, No. 3, 156-161(Aug 1996); PBD: Aug 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; FORESTRY; SILVICULTURE; DECIDUOUS TREES; PLANT GROWTH; COTTONWOODS; PECAN TREES; SWEET GUMS

Citation Formats

Goelz, J.C.G. Open-grown crown radius of eleven bottomland hardwood species: Prediction and use in assessing stocking. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Goelz, J.C.G. Open-grown crown radius of eleven bottomland hardwood species: Prediction and use in assessing stocking. United States.
Goelz, J.C.G. 1996. "Open-grown crown radius of eleven bottomland hardwood species: Prediction and use in assessing stocking". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_422102,
title = {Open-grown crown radius of eleven bottomland hardwood species: Prediction and use in assessing stocking},
author = {Goelz, J.C.G.},
abstractNote = {Equations were prepared to predict crown radius for eleven species of open-grown bottomland hardwood trees. Crown radius was predicted as a function of diameter at breast height (dbh) and as a function of dbh, total height, and crown ratio. Equations were prepared for individual species and species groups. Pecan has the largest crowns over a broad range of dbh. Eastern cottonwood has the smallest crowns for most levels of dbh. Sweetgum has relatively small crowns for trees of small dbh, but crown radius is comparable to most species at the largest dbh. The crown radius predictions may be used to calculate crown competition factor. B-lines of stocking may be calculated that represent a stand of one species as well as a mixed-species stand of any particular species proportion.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1996,
month = 8
}

Technical Report:
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