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Title: Using seismic derived lithology parameters for hydrocarbon indication

Abstract

The last two decades have shown a strong increase in the use of seismic amplitude information for direct hydrocarbon indication. However, working with seismic amplitudes (and seismic attributes) has several drawbacks: tuning effects must be handled; quantitative analysis is difficult because seismic amplitudes are not directly related to lithology; and seismic amplitudes are reflection events, making it is unclear if amplitude changes relate to lithology variations above or below the interface. These drawbacks are overcome by working directly on seismic derived lithology data, lithology being a layer property rather than an interface property. Technology to extract lithology from seismic data has made great strides, and a large range of methods are now available to users including: (1) Bandlimited acoustic impedance (AI) inversion; (2) Reconstruction of the low AI frequencies from seismic velocities, from spatial well log interpolation, and using constrained sparse spike inversion techniques; (3) Full bandwidth reconstruction of multiple lithology properties (porosity, sand fraction, density etc.,) in time and depth using inverse modeling. For these technologies to be fully leveraged, accessibility by end users is critical. All these technologies are available as interactive 2D and 3D workstation applications, integrated with seismic interpretation functionality. Using field data examples, we willmore » demonstrate the impact of these different approaches on deriving lithology, and in particular show how accuracy and resolution is increased as more geologic and well information is added.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Jason Geosystems, Houston, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
421221
Report Number(s):
CONF-9609255-
Journal ID: AABUD2; ISSN 0149-1423; TRN: 96:005770-0209
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
AAPG Bulletin
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 80; Journal Issue: 8; Conference: American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) international conferences and exhibition, Caracas (Venezuela), 8-11 Sep 1996; Other Information: PBD: Aug 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; PETROLEUM INDUSTRY; PROSPECTING; SEISMIC SURVEYS; DATA ACQUISITION; RESERVOIR ROCK; LITHOLOGY; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; PETROLEUM; EXPLORATION

Citation Formats

Van Riel, P, and Sisk, M. Using seismic derived lithology parameters for hydrocarbon indication. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Van Riel, P, & Sisk, M. Using seismic derived lithology parameters for hydrocarbon indication. United States.
Van Riel, P, and Sisk, M. Thu . "Using seismic derived lithology parameters for hydrocarbon indication". United States.
@article{osti_421221,
title = {Using seismic derived lithology parameters for hydrocarbon indication},
author = {Van Riel, P and Sisk, M},
abstractNote = {The last two decades have shown a strong increase in the use of seismic amplitude information for direct hydrocarbon indication. However, working with seismic amplitudes (and seismic attributes) has several drawbacks: tuning effects must be handled; quantitative analysis is difficult because seismic amplitudes are not directly related to lithology; and seismic amplitudes are reflection events, making it is unclear if amplitude changes relate to lithology variations above or below the interface. These drawbacks are overcome by working directly on seismic derived lithology data, lithology being a layer property rather than an interface property. Technology to extract lithology from seismic data has made great strides, and a large range of methods are now available to users including: (1) Bandlimited acoustic impedance (AI) inversion; (2) Reconstruction of the low AI frequencies from seismic velocities, from spatial well log interpolation, and using constrained sparse spike inversion techniques; (3) Full bandwidth reconstruction of multiple lithology properties (porosity, sand fraction, density etc.,) in time and depth using inverse modeling. For these technologies to be fully leveraged, accessibility by end users is critical. All these technologies are available as interactive 2D and 3D workstation applications, integrated with seismic interpretation functionality. Using field data examples, we will demonstrate the impact of these different approaches on deriving lithology, and in particular show how accuracy and resolution is increased as more geologic and well information is added.},
doi = {},
journal = {AAPG Bulletin},
number = 8,
volume = 80,
place = {United States},
year = {1996},
month = {8}
}