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Title: Broad-band Fourier transform quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry

Abstract

Broad-band nondestructive ion detection is achieved in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer by impulsive excitation of a collection of trapped ions of different masses and recording of ion image currents induced on a small detector electrode embedded in but isolated from the adjacent end cap electrode. The image currents are directly measured using a simple differential preamplifier, filter, and amplifier combination and then Fourier analyzed to obtain broad-band frequency domain spectra characteristic of the sample ions. The use of the detector electrode provides a significant reduction in capacitive coupling with the ring electrode. This minimizes coupling of the rf drive signal, which can saturate the front-end stage of the detection circuit and prevent measurement of the relatively weaker ion image currents. Although impulsive excitation is preferred due to its broad-band characteristics and simplicity of use, results are also given for narrow-band ac and broad-band SWIFT (stored wave-form inverse Fourier transform) excitation. Data using argon, acetophenone, and n-butylbenzene show that a resolution of better than 1000 is obtained with a detection bandwidth of 400 kHz. An advantage of nondestructive ion detection is the ability to measure a single-ion population multiple times. This is demonstrated using argon as the sample gasmore » with an average measurement efficiency of > 90%. 29 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
420793
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Analytical Chemistry (Washington)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 68; Journal Issue: 19; Other Information: PBD: 1 Oct 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
40 CHEMISTRY; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; MASS SPECTRA; NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING; IONS; MASS SPECTROMETERS; ELECTRODES; CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; FOURIER TRANSFORM SPECTROMETERS

Citation Formats

Soni, M, Frankevich, V, Nappi, M, Santini, R E, Amy, J W, and Cooks, R G. Broad-band Fourier transform quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry. United States: N. p., 1996. Web. doi:10.1021/ac960577s.
Soni, M, Frankevich, V, Nappi, M, Santini, R E, Amy, J W, & Cooks, R G. Broad-band Fourier transform quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry. United States. https://doi.org/10.1021/ac960577s
Soni, M, Frankevich, V, Nappi, M, Santini, R E, Amy, J W, and Cooks, R G. Tue . "Broad-band Fourier transform quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry". United States. https://doi.org/10.1021/ac960577s.
@article{osti_420793,
title = {Broad-band Fourier transform quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry},
author = {Soni, M and Frankevich, V and Nappi, M and Santini, R E and Amy, J W and Cooks, R G},
abstractNote = {Broad-band nondestructive ion detection is achieved in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer by impulsive excitation of a collection of trapped ions of different masses and recording of ion image currents induced on a small detector electrode embedded in but isolated from the adjacent end cap electrode. The image currents are directly measured using a simple differential preamplifier, filter, and amplifier combination and then Fourier analyzed to obtain broad-band frequency domain spectra characteristic of the sample ions. The use of the detector electrode provides a significant reduction in capacitive coupling with the ring electrode. This minimizes coupling of the rf drive signal, which can saturate the front-end stage of the detection circuit and prevent measurement of the relatively weaker ion image currents. Although impulsive excitation is preferred due to its broad-band characteristics and simplicity of use, results are also given for narrow-band ac and broad-band SWIFT (stored wave-form inverse Fourier transform) excitation. Data using argon, acetophenone, and n-butylbenzene show that a resolution of better than 1000 is obtained with a detection bandwidth of 400 kHz. An advantage of nondestructive ion detection is the ability to measure a single-ion population multiple times. This is demonstrated using argon as the sample gas with an average measurement efficiency of > 90%. 29 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.},
doi = {10.1021/ac960577s},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/420793}, journal = {Analytical Chemistry (Washington)},
number = 19,
volume = 68,
place = {United States},
year = {1996},
month = {10}
}