skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Medical Waste Co-Firing Comes of Age

Abstract

In early 1992 DONLEE Technologies, Inc., in cooperation with the Department of Energy Fossil Energy Program, completed pilot testing of simulated non-infectious waste combustion, co-fired with coal, at its test facility in York, Pennsylvania. The goal of this testing was to demonstrate the ability of fluidized bed combustion to completely destruct medical waste with minimized dioxin emissions. The test facility is a full scale circulating fluidized bed unit with a maximum heat input capability of ten million BTU per hour. The tests showed that the circulating fluidized bed system is ideally suited to meet the medical/infectious waste destruction needs of the health care industry. The dioxin emission levels proved to be significantly lower than those from presently operating MWIS. Based on the successful test results, a cooperative agreement with the Department of Energy Fossil Energy Power Systems, DONLEE Technologies, and the Veterans Administration was reached to design, construct, and test a demonstration unit at the Veterans Administration Medical Center in Lebanon, Pennsylvania. Plant design and construction was started in 1993, with DONLEE Technologies functioning as both the technology supplier and the plant EPC contractor. After some delay the construction of the demonstration unit finally reached completion in the spring ofmore » 1996. The unit is currently undergoing initial shakedown and testing to verify the base operating parameters. The unit will first be fired with coal only, followed by the introduction of non-infectious waste and finally total waste, including the ``red bag`` material. The program calls for an extended testing period of up to one year. While the unit is being operated as part of the stream supply system at the VA Hospital, the hospital`s waste is destroyed via combustion in the Fluidized Bed Unit.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Donlee Technologies, Inc., York, PA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), WV (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
419316
Report Number(s):
DOE/MC/27205-97/C0710; CONF-960757-9
ON: DE97051007
DOE Contract Number:  
FC21-91MC27205
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Advanced coal-fired power systems review meeting, Morgantown, WV (United States), 16-18 Jul 1996; Other Information: PBD: 18 Dec 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; COAL; FLUIDIZED-BED COMBUSTION; BIOLOGICAL WASTES; COCOMBUSTION; HOSPITALS; DEMONSTRATION PROGRAMS; CIRCULATING SYSTEMS

Citation Formats

Smith-Berntson, K, and Stuart, J M. Medical Waste Co-Firing Comes of Age. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Smith-Berntson, K, & Stuart, J M. Medical Waste Co-Firing Comes of Age. United States.
Smith-Berntson, K, and Stuart, J M. 1996. "Medical Waste Co-Firing Comes of Age". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/419316.
@article{osti_419316,
title = {Medical Waste Co-Firing Comes of Age},
author = {Smith-Berntson, K and Stuart, J M},
abstractNote = {In early 1992 DONLEE Technologies, Inc., in cooperation with the Department of Energy Fossil Energy Program, completed pilot testing of simulated non-infectious waste combustion, co-fired with coal, at its test facility in York, Pennsylvania. The goal of this testing was to demonstrate the ability of fluidized bed combustion to completely destruct medical waste with minimized dioxin emissions. The test facility is a full scale circulating fluidized bed unit with a maximum heat input capability of ten million BTU per hour. The tests showed that the circulating fluidized bed system is ideally suited to meet the medical/infectious waste destruction needs of the health care industry. The dioxin emission levels proved to be significantly lower than those from presently operating MWIS. Based on the successful test results, a cooperative agreement with the Department of Energy Fossil Energy Power Systems, DONLEE Technologies, and the Veterans Administration was reached to design, construct, and test a demonstration unit at the Veterans Administration Medical Center in Lebanon, Pennsylvania. Plant design and construction was started in 1993, with DONLEE Technologies functioning as both the technology supplier and the plant EPC contractor. After some delay the construction of the demonstration unit finally reached completion in the spring of 1996. The unit is currently undergoing initial shakedown and testing to verify the base operating parameters. The unit will first be fired with coal only, followed by the introduction of non-infectious waste and finally total waste, including the ``red bag`` material. The program calls for an extended testing period of up to one year. While the unit is being operated as part of the stream supply system at the VA Hospital, the hospital`s waste is destroyed via combustion in the Fluidized Bed Unit.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/419316}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1996},
month = {12}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share: