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Title: Proliferation: Threat and response

Abstract

During the height of the Cold War, the Russian physicist Andre Sakharov said, `Reducing the risk of annihilating humanity in a nuclear war carries an absolute priority over all other considerations.` The end of the Cold War has reduced the threat of global nuclear war, but today a new threat is rising from the global spread of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons. Hostile groups and nations have tried - or have been able - to obtain these weapons, the technology, and homegrown ability to make them or ballistic missiles that can deliver the massive annihilation, poison, and death of these weapons hundreds of miles away. For rogue nations, these weapons are a ticket to power, stature, and confidence in regional war.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Office of the Secretary of Defense, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
418879
Report Number(s):
AD-A-314341/9/XAB
TRN: 63440156
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Apr 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
35 ARMS CONTROL; 45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; CHEMICAL WARFARE AGENTS; PROLIFERATION; ARMS CONTROL; BIOLOGICAL WARFARE AGENTS

Citation Formats

NONE. Proliferation: Threat and response. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
NONE. Proliferation: Threat and response. United States.
NONE. Mon . "Proliferation: Threat and response". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_418879,
title = {Proliferation: Threat and response},
author = {NONE},
abstractNote = {During the height of the Cold War, the Russian physicist Andre Sakharov said, `Reducing the risk of annihilating humanity in a nuclear war carries an absolute priority over all other considerations.` The end of the Cold War has reduced the threat of global nuclear war, but today a new threat is rising from the global spread of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons. Hostile groups and nations have tried - or have been able - to obtain these weapons, the technology, and homegrown ability to make them or ballistic missiles that can deliver the massive annihilation, poison, and death of these weapons hundreds of miles away. For rogue nations, these weapons are a ticket to power, stature, and confidence in regional war.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 01 00:00:00 EST 1996},
month = {Mon Apr 01 00:00:00 EST 1996}
}

Technical Report:
Other availability
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  • ;Table of Contents: Section I: The Regional Proliferation Challenge; Northeast Asia; The Middle East and North Africa; The Former Soviet Union: Russia, Ukrane, Kazakstan, And Belarus; South Asia; The International Threat: Dangers from Terrorism, Insurgencies, Civil Wars, And Organized Crime; Section II: Department of Defense Response; Technical Annex: Accessible Technologies; Glossary.
  • Table of Contents: The Regional Proliferation Challenge; Northeast Asia; South Asia; The Middle East and North Africa; Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, and Belarus; The Transnational Threat; Department of Defense Response; Prevention; Protection; Acquisition; DOD Capabilities to Respond to NBC Terrorism; Conclusion; Technical Annex; Further Reading; and Glossary.
  • The May 1997 Report of the Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR) concluded that the threat or use of nuclear, biological, or chemical (NBC) weapons is a likely condition of future warfare and could occur in the early stages of war to disrupt US operations and logistics. These weapons may be delivered by ballistic missiles, cruise missiles, aircraft, special operations forces, or other means. In many of the world`s regions where the United States is likely to deploy forces--including Northeast Asia and the Middle East--potential adversaries have chemical and/or biological weapons and the missile systems to deliver them, and actively seek nuclearmore » weapons. Potential adversaries may seek to counter American conventional military superiority using less expensive and more attainable, asymmetrical means, including NBC weapons. To meet this challenge, as well as the possibility that NBC weapons might also be used in some smaller-scale contingencies, US forces must be properly trained and equipped to operate effectively and decisively in the face of NBC attacks. The first section of this report details the proliferation of NBC weapons and the threat it poses to US interests and forces.« less
  • The threat of biological weapons presents a special military challenge. Biological toxin warfare (BTW) agents are more potent than chemical warfare agents. Depending on the yield of the nuclear weapon, a biological weapon also can have a higher lethality than nuclear weapons. This thesis examines existing international restrictions on the proliferation of BTW technology and identifies their shortcomings. These loopholes contribute to the easy availability of the technology necessary to develop biological weapons programs. As efforts to curb BTW proliferation continue with little avail, it is necessary to examine military means for neutralizing or destroying biological pathogens and toxins inmore » both the production and weaponization phases. One such method, enhanced radiation weaponry, is examined in this thesis and is shown to be a viable means of neutralizing pathogens and toxins.« less
  • In present discussions on international security the issue of proliferation plays an important role. The problem itself is not a new one. However, the problem is of increasing importance due to various traditional and current risks. To clearly define and control these risks is getting more complicated since the clear cut international structures of the `Cold War` era no longer exist. NATO addressed the problem in the `Alliance New Strategic Concept` in 1991 as a challenge and a risk to international security without defining the particular competence of NATO in this field. However, the Alliance obliged itself to continue andmore » strengthen cooperative efforts to prevent or reverse proliferation. For this purpose in 1994, NATO established working groups to examine the implications of proliferation for the defense planning and capabilities of NATO and its members and to consider what measures can be taken in the defense field.« less