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Title: Potential global climate change

Abstract

Global economic integration and growth contribute much to the construction of energy plants, vehicles and other industrial products that produces carbon emission and in effect cause the destruction of the environment. A coordinated policy and response worldwide to curb emissions and to effect global climate change must be introduced. Improvement in scientific understanding is required to monitor how much emission reduction is necessary. In the near term, especially in the next seven years, sustained research and development for low carbon or carbon-free energy is necessary. Other measures must also be introduced, such as limiting the use of vehicles, closing down inefficient power plants, etc. In the long term, the use of the electric car, use solar energy, etc. is required. Reforestation must also be considered to absorb large amounts of carbon in the atmosphere.

Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
418687
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Energy; Journal Volume: 19; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: PBD: Sep 1994
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; CLIMATIC CHANGE; ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; AUTOMOBILES; RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES; FUEL SUBSTITUTION; ENERGY EFFICIENCY

Citation Formats

NONE. Potential global climate change. United States: N. p., 1994. Web.
NONE. Potential global climate change. United States.
NONE. 1994. "Potential global climate change". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_418687,
title = {Potential global climate change},
author = {NONE},
abstractNote = {Global economic integration and growth contribute much to the construction of energy plants, vehicles and other industrial products that produces carbon emission and in effect cause the destruction of the environment. A coordinated policy and response worldwide to curb emissions and to effect global climate change must be introduced. Improvement in scientific understanding is required to monitor how much emission reduction is necessary. In the near term, especially in the next seven years, sustained research and development for low carbon or carbon-free energy is necessary. Other measures must also be introduced, such as limiting the use of vehicles, closing down inefficient power plants, etc. In the long term, the use of the electric car, use solar energy, etc. is required. Reforestation must also be considered to absorb large amounts of carbon in the atmosphere.},
doi = {},
journal = {Energy},
number = 4,
volume = 19,
place = {United States},
year = 1994,
month = 9
}
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  • No abstract prepared.
  • The Vegetation/Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project (VEMAP) dataset consists of inputs for biogeochemical and biogeographical models, including current climate, climate scenarios, soils, and vegetation for the conterminous United States on a 0.5 deg lat./lon. grid. The set has daily and monthly representations of climate. Monthly temperature (T) and precipitation (PPT) were derived from station records or statistically-generated from nearby stations. These values were interpolated to the grid accounting for orographic effects in an effort to make the grid-scale climate representative of actual bioclimates within grid cells; this was crucial because ecosystem responses are nonlinearly related to climate. Daily T andmore » PPT were stochastically simulated with WGEN, and daily solar radiation and humidity empirically estimated with CLIMSIM. Equilibrium climate change scenarios were selected to capture a range of potential change from GCM experiments. Transient scenario rates of change were based on atmosphere-ocean GCM results. Mean climate, equilibrium scenarios, vegetation, and soil data are available on CD-ROM.« less
  • Atmospheric concentrations of many greenhouse gases, in particular carbon dioxide and methane, are rapidly increasing from preindustrial levels. This paper explores the potential feedback from northern wetlands, particularly with regard to carbon dioxide and methane flux, to climate change. Although progress has been made in determining current trace gas fluxes from major biomass, the authors believe that a mechanistic approach is necessary to predict the direct and indirect feedbacks between climate and northern wetlands. Relevant areas covered in the article include the following: feedback mechanisms; carbon and nutrient mineralization; the kinetics of carbon and nutrient mineralization; methane oxidation and themore » role of plants; field dynamics of gases in a meadow and bog in Minnesota; and extrapolating to larger scales. 80 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.« less