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Title: Make CMMS work for you

Abstract

One of the most widespread information technologies in today`s powerplants is the computer-based maintenance management system. In spite of their popularity, these systems still have a long way to go before they can be called user-friendly. Computer-based maintenance management systems (CMMS) have become a staple of the lean, competitive powerplant`s diet. With many systems on the market, each with its own slew of options to pick from, it pays to shop around. But system procurement is not always straightforward, and proper implementation can be both time-consuming and expensive. Software costs are just the tip of the iceberg.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
418013
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Power (New York); Journal Volume: 140; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: PBD: Sep-Oct 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; POWER PLANTS; MAINTENANCE; INFORMATION SYSTEMS; AUTOMATION; HUMAN FACTORS; MAN-MACHINE SYSTEMS

Citation Formats

Stoddard, L. Make CMMS work for you. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Stoddard, L. Make CMMS work for you. United States.
Stoddard, L. Sun . "Make CMMS work for you". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_418013,
title = {Make CMMS work for you},
author = {Stoddard, L.},
abstractNote = {One of the most widespread information technologies in today`s powerplants is the computer-based maintenance management system. In spite of their popularity, these systems still have a long way to go before they can be called user-friendly. Computer-based maintenance management systems (CMMS) have become a staple of the lean, competitive powerplant`s diet. With many systems on the market, each with its own slew of options to pick from, it pays to shop around. But system procurement is not always straightforward, and proper implementation can be both time-consuming and expensive. Software costs are just the tip of the iceberg.},
doi = {},
journal = {Power (New York)},
number = 8,
volume = 140,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 1996},
month = {Sun Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 1996}
}
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