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Title: Rapid detection of chemical agents using direct sampling ion trap mass spectrometry

Abstract

Advances in ion trap mass spectrometry have led to the development of highly sensitive analytical instruments which are versatile, simple, and relatively easy to operate. In addition, dramatic reductions in the size and weight of ion trap mass spectrometers have facilitated the modification of these devices for use in the field. These combined features have been exploited for the development of direct thermal desorption mass spectrometry methods for the rapid determination of trace levels of chemical warfare agents and precursors in air and other media. These analytical methods generally require only minimal sample preparation and utilize little or no chromatographic separation of the analytes prior to mass analysis. This provides fast results and a high sample throughput. Compound specificity is achieved through the combined use of selective chemical ionization (CI) and collision induced dissociation multi-stage mass spectrometry (MS/MS) making it possible to discriminate against many common chemical interferences such as hydrocarbons. The thermal desorber inlet for the ion trap was designed to be used with standard 3 inch x 0.25 inch sorbent tubes (DAAMS tubes) packed with either Tenax or Chromosorb 106. In addition to the analysis of compounds collected on sorbent tubes, the thermal desorber can also be usedmore » as a heated injector for the direct analysis of microliter aliquotes of liquid samples, such as groundwater and extracts of plant material. Detection limits are typically in the range of 50 pg of analyte adsorbed onto a sorbent tube and sample turnaround time is approximately 2-3 minutes. This technology has been evaluated using GB, G-analog of VX, and HD as well as simulants for each of these compounds. Work is also currently in progress in our laboratory to evaluate the capabilities of various other ion trap mass spectrometers and inlet configurations for real-time determination of CW agents and precursors which may be encountered in a variety of scenarios.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); and others
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
416150
Report Number(s):
ORNL/M-4315; CONF-9409370-
ON: DE95016127; TRN: 96:006560-0005
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Analytical methods for environmental sampling of chemical warfare agents and their degradation products, Aberdeen, MD (United States), 20-21 Sep 1994; Other Information: PBD: Jun 1995; Related Information: Is Part Of Analytical methods for environmental sampling of chemical warfare agents and their degradation products; Watson, A.P. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]; Kistner, S. [ed.] [Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States)]; PB: 180 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; CHEMICAL WARFARE AGENTS; CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; MASS SPECTROMETERS

Citation Formats

Wise, M B, Ilgner, R H, and Buchanan, M V. Rapid detection of chemical agents using direct sampling ion trap mass spectrometry. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Wise, M B, Ilgner, R H, & Buchanan, M V. Rapid detection of chemical agents using direct sampling ion trap mass spectrometry. United States.
Wise, M B, Ilgner, R H, and Buchanan, M V. Thu . "Rapid detection of chemical agents using direct sampling ion trap mass spectrometry". United States.
@article{osti_416150,
title = {Rapid detection of chemical agents using direct sampling ion trap mass spectrometry},
author = {Wise, M B and Ilgner, R H and Buchanan, M V},
abstractNote = {Advances in ion trap mass spectrometry have led to the development of highly sensitive analytical instruments which are versatile, simple, and relatively easy to operate. In addition, dramatic reductions in the size and weight of ion trap mass spectrometers have facilitated the modification of these devices for use in the field. These combined features have been exploited for the development of direct thermal desorption mass spectrometry methods for the rapid determination of trace levels of chemical warfare agents and precursors in air and other media. These analytical methods generally require only minimal sample preparation and utilize little or no chromatographic separation of the analytes prior to mass analysis. This provides fast results and a high sample throughput. Compound specificity is achieved through the combined use of selective chemical ionization (CI) and collision induced dissociation multi-stage mass spectrometry (MS/MS) making it possible to discriminate against many common chemical interferences such as hydrocarbons. The thermal desorber inlet for the ion trap was designed to be used with standard 3 inch x 0.25 inch sorbent tubes (DAAMS tubes) packed with either Tenax or Chromosorb 106. In addition to the analysis of compounds collected on sorbent tubes, the thermal desorber can also be used as a heated injector for the direct analysis of microliter aliquotes of liquid samples, such as groundwater and extracts of plant material. Detection limits are typically in the range of 50 pg of analyte adsorbed onto a sorbent tube and sample turnaround time is approximately 2-3 minutes. This technology has been evaluated using GB, G-analog of VX, and HD as well as simulants for each of these compounds. Work is also currently in progress in our laboratory to evaluate the capabilities of various other ion trap mass spectrometers and inlet configurations for real-time determination of CW agents and precursors which may be encountered in a variety of scenarios.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/416150}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1995},
month = {6}
}

Conference:
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