skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Two-dimensional pixel array image sensor for protein crystallography

Abstract

A 2D pixel array image sensor module has been designed for time resolved Protein Crystallography. This smart pixels detector significantly enhances time resolved Laue Protein crystallography by two to three orders of magnitude compared to existing sensors like films or phosphor screens coupled to CCDs. The resolution in time and dynamic range of this type of detector will allow one to study the evolution of structural changes that occur within the protein as a function of time. This detector will also considerably accelerate data collection in static Laue or monochromatic crystallography and make better use of the intense beam delivered by synchrotron light sources. The event driven pixel array detectors, based on the column Architecture, can provide multiparameter information (energy discrimination, time), with sparse and frameless readout without significant dead time. The prototype module consists of a 16x16 pixel diode array bump-bonded to the integrated circuit. The detection area is 150x150 square microns.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. and others
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Research, Washington, DC (United States); National Insts. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
413167
Report Number(s):
LBNL-39016; CONF-960848-27
ON: TI96014920; CNN: Grant RR10748
DOE Contract Number:
AC03-76SF00098
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Conference: Denver `96: 1. conference on space processing of materials, at SPIE International Society for Optical Engineering (SPIE) annual international symposium on optical science, engineering, and instrumentation, Denver, CO (United States), 4-9 Aug 1996; Other Information: PBD: Jul 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; 44 INSTRUMENTATION, INCLUDING NUCLEAR AND PARTICLE DETECTORS; 42 ENGINEERING NOT INCLUDED IN OTHER CATEGORIES; X-RAY DIFFRACTION; PHOTODETECTORS; PHOTODIODES; FABRICATION; X-RAY DIFFRACTOMETERS; PROTEIN STRUCTURE; MICROELECTRONIC CIRCUITS

Citation Formats

Beuville, E., Beche, J.-F., and Cork, C. Two-dimensional pixel array image sensor for protein crystallography. United States: N. p., 1996. Web. doi:10.2172/413167.
Beuville, E., Beche, J.-F., & Cork, C. Two-dimensional pixel array image sensor for protein crystallography. United States. doi:10.2172/413167.
Beuville, E., Beche, J.-F., and Cork, C. Mon . "Two-dimensional pixel array image sensor for protein crystallography". United States. doi:10.2172/413167. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/413167.
@article{osti_413167,
title = {Two-dimensional pixel array image sensor for protein crystallography},
author = {Beuville, E. and Beche, J.-F. and Cork, C.},
abstractNote = {A 2D pixel array image sensor module has been designed for time resolved Protein Crystallography. This smart pixels detector significantly enhances time resolved Laue Protein crystallography by two to three orders of magnitude compared to existing sensors like films or phosphor screens coupled to CCDs. The resolution in time and dynamic range of this type of detector will allow one to study the evolution of structural changes that occur within the protein as a function of time. This detector will also considerably accelerate data collection in static Laue or monochromatic crystallography and make better use of the intense beam delivered by synchrotron light sources. The event driven pixel array detectors, based on the column Architecture, can provide multiparameter information (energy discrimination, time), with sparse and frameless readout without significant dead time. The prototype module consists of a 16x16 pixel diode array bump-bonded to the integrated circuit. The detection area is 150x150 square microns.},
doi = {10.2172/413167},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 1996},
month = {Mon Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 1996}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share:
  • Previous proof-of-concept measurements on single-layer two-dimensional membrane-protein crystals performed at X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) have demonstrated that the collection of meaningful diffraction patterns, which is not possible at synchrotrons because of radiation-damage issues, is feasible. Here, the results obtained from the analysis of a thousand single-shot, room-temperature X-ray FEL diffraction images from two-dimensional crystals of a bacteriorhodopsin mutant are reported in detail. The high redundancy in the measurements boosts the intensity signal-to-noise ratio, so that the values of the diffracted intensities can be reliably determined down to the detector-edge resolution of 4 Å. The results show that two-dimensional serial crystallography atmore » X-ray FELs is a suitable method to study membrane proteins to near-atomic length scales at ambient temperature. The method presented here can be extended to pump–probe studies of optically triggered structural changes on submillisecond timescales in two-dimensional crystals, which allow functionally relevant large-scale motions that may be quenched in three-dimensional crystals.« less
  • No abstract prepared.
  • A method has been developed for determining the magnitude and direction of an unknown velocity vector utilizing two-dimensional thermal anemometry. Unlike most thermal anemometry procedures, the analysis accounts for the velocity component parellel to the sensing element. The method requires determination or calibration of the flow constants at only two flow orientations: perpendicular to each sensing element. A comparison of the analysis to calibrated nozzel flow data showed good agreement for both the flow angle and velocity magnitude within the range of applicability. This type of thermal anemometry will be used to help characterize flows in and around optical accessmore » ports. 2 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.« less
  • An image-tracking and stabilizing device has been built, tested, and characterized. This device uses the Burleigh Inchworm piezoelectric micropositioner to maintain a focused image of a bright object on a staring photodetector array. It is capable of both the large-angle, rapid displacements (in excess of 20/sup 0/ at 100 mrad/s) required for tracking moving objects and the precise, small-angle displacements required for image-jitter stabilization (within +-0.5 mm) on a staring-array photodetector.
  • No abstract prepared.