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Title: Harvard-MIT research program in short-lived radiopharmaceuticals. Final report

Abstract

The Harvard-MIT Research Program in Short-lived Radiopharmaceuticals was established in 1977 to foster interaction among groups working in radiopharmaceutical chemistry at Harvard Medical School, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the Massachusetts General Hospital. To this was added a group at The Childrens Hospital. From these collaborations and building upon the special strengths of the participating individuals, laboratories and institutions, it was hoped that original approaches would be found for the design of new, clinically useful, radiolabeled compounds. The original thrust of this proposal included: (a) examination of the coordination chemistry of technetium as a basis for rational radiopharmaceutical design, (b) development of an ultrashort-lived radionuclide generator for the diagnosis of congenital heart disease in newborns, (c) synthesis of receptor-site-directed halopharmaceuticals, (d) improved facile labeling of complex molecules with positron-emitting radionuclides. The authors` 1986 proposal was oriented toward organs and disease, emphasizing radiolabeled agents that delineate specific functions and the distribution of receptors in brain, heart, and tumors. In 1989, they further refined their purposes and focused on two major aims: (a) synthesis and utilization of neutral technetium and rhenium complexes of high specific activity, and (b) development of new approaches to the radiolabeling of proteins, peptides, immunoglobulins, and theirmore » fragments. In 1992, the authors amended this proposal to concentrate their efforts on biologically active peptides and proteins for targeted radiodiagnosis and therapy.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Office of Sponsored Programs
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
41285
Report Number(s):
DOE/ER/60460-T4
ON: DE95009691; TRN: AHC29512%%22
DOE Contract Number:  
FG02-86ER60460; FG02-87ER60526
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Feb 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; RADIOPHARMACEUTICALS; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; PROGRESS REPORT; DIAGNOSTIC USES; THERAPEUTIC USES

Citation Formats

Adelstein, S.J. Harvard-MIT research program in short-lived radiopharmaceuticals. Final report. United States: N. p., 1995. Web. doi:10.2172/41285.
Adelstein, S.J. Harvard-MIT research program in short-lived radiopharmaceuticals. Final report. United States. doi:10.2172/41285.
Adelstein, S.J. Wed . "Harvard-MIT research program in short-lived radiopharmaceuticals. Final report". United States. doi:10.2172/41285. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/41285.
@article{osti_41285,
title = {Harvard-MIT research program in short-lived radiopharmaceuticals. Final report},
author = {Adelstein, S.J.},
abstractNote = {The Harvard-MIT Research Program in Short-lived Radiopharmaceuticals was established in 1977 to foster interaction among groups working in radiopharmaceutical chemistry at Harvard Medical School, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the Massachusetts General Hospital. To this was added a group at The Childrens Hospital. From these collaborations and building upon the special strengths of the participating individuals, laboratories and institutions, it was hoped that original approaches would be found for the design of new, clinically useful, radiolabeled compounds. The original thrust of this proposal included: (a) examination of the coordination chemistry of technetium as a basis for rational radiopharmaceutical design, (b) development of an ultrashort-lived radionuclide generator for the diagnosis of congenital heart disease in newborns, (c) synthesis of receptor-site-directed halopharmaceuticals, (d) improved facile labeling of complex molecules with positron-emitting radionuclides. The authors` 1986 proposal was oriented toward organs and disease, emphasizing radiolabeled agents that delineate specific functions and the distribution of receptors in brain, heart, and tumors. In 1989, they further refined their purposes and focused on two major aims: (a) synthesis and utilization of neutral technetium and rhenium complexes of high specific activity, and (b) development of new approaches to the radiolabeling of proteins, peptides, immunoglobulins, and their fragments. In 1992, the authors amended this proposal to concentrate their efforts on biologically active peptides and proteins for targeted radiodiagnosis and therapy.},
doi = {10.2172/41285},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1995},
month = {2}
}