skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Gas potential of the Rome Trough in Kentucky: Results of recent Cambrian exploration

Abstract

A recent gas discovery in the Rome Trough suggests the need to re-evaluate the deep Cambrian potential of eastern Kentucky. A new phase of Cambrian exploration began in mid-1994 with a new pool discovery by the Carson Associates No. 1 Kazee well in Elliott County, Ky. This well blew out and initially flowed 11 MMcfd of gas from the upper Conasauga Group/Rome Formation at 6,258 to 6,270 feet. After this discovery, a second exploratory well (the Blue Ridge No. 1Greene) was drilled on a separate structure in Elliott County in late 1995. The Blue Ridge well was temporarily abandoned, but had shows of gas and condensate. In early 1996, Carson Associates offset their initial discovery well with the No. 33 Lawson Heirs well. This activity follows a frustrating exploration history in the Rome Trough that is marked by numerous gas and oil shows, but rare commercial production. Only three single-well pools have produced commercial gas from the trough, including the recent Kazee well. Stratigraphic units below the Cambrian-Ordovician Knox Group in the Rome Trough are dramatically thicker than their equivalents on the shelf to the north. The interval in the trough is thought to include rocks as old as Earlymore » Cambrian, consisting of a basal sandstone, equivalents of the Shady/Tomstown Dolomite, the Rome Formation, and the Conasauga Formation. Sandstones and fractured shales have been responsible for most of the production to date, but dolostone intervals may also have potential. Limited seismic data indicate possible fan-delta and basin-floor fan deposits that may have reservoir potential.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
411933
Report Number(s):
CONF-9610180-
Journal ID: AABUD2; ISSN 0149-1423; TRN: 96:005901-0065
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
AAPG Bulletin
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 80; Journal Issue: 9; Conference: American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) gulf coast association of geological societies meeting, San Antonio, TX (United States), 2-4 Oct 1996; Other Information: PBD: Sep 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; KENTUCKY; NATURAL GAS DEPOSITS; RESERVOIR ROCK; RESOURCE POTENTIAL; NATURAL GAS; EXPLORATION; PRODUCTION

Citation Formats

Harris, D C, and Drahovzal, J A. Gas potential of the Rome Trough in Kentucky: Results of recent Cambrian exploration. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Harris, D C, & Drahovzal, J A. Gas potential of the Rome Trough in Kentucky: Results of recent Cambrian exploration. United States.
Harris, D C, and Drahovzal, J A. Sun . "Gas potential of the Rome Trough in Kentucky: Results of recent Cambrian exploration". United States.
@article{osti_411933,
title = {Gas potential of the Rome Trough in Kentucky: Results of recent Cambrian exploration},
author = {Harris, D C and Drahovzal, J A},
abstractNote = {A recent gas discovery in the Rome Trough suggests the need to re-evaluate the deep Cambrian potential of eastern Kentucky. A new phase of Cambrian exploration began in mid-1994 with a new pool discovery by the Carson Associates No. 1 Kazee well in Elliott County, Ky. This well blew out and initially flowed 11 MMcfd of gas from the upper Conasauga Group/Rome Formation at 6,258 to 6,270 feet. After this discovery, a second exploratory well (the Blue Ridge No. 1Greene) was drilled on a separate structure in Elliott County in late 1995. The Blue Ridge well was temporarily abandoned, but had shows of gas and condensate. In early 1996, Carson Associates offset their initial discovery well with the No. 33 Lawson Heirs well. This activity follows a frustrating exploration history in the Rome Trough that is marked by numerous gas and oil shows, but rare commercial production. Only three single-well pools have produced commercial gas from the trough, including the recent Kazee well. Stratigraphic units below the Cambrian-Ordovician Knox Group in the Rome Trough are dramatically thicker than their equivalents on the shelf to the north. The interval in the trough is thought to include rocks as old as Early Cambrian, consisting of a basal sandstone, equivalents of the Shady/Tomstown Dolomite, the Rome Formation, and the Conasauga Formation. Sandstones and fractured shales have been responsible for most of the production to date, but dolostone intervals may also have potential. Limited seismic data indicate possible fan-delta and basin-floor fan deposits that may have reservoir potential.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/411933}, journal = {AAPG Bulletin},
number = 9,
volume = 80,
place = {United States},
year = {1996},
month = {9}
}