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Title: SOME FUEL LOSS RATE AND WEIGHT ESTIMATES OF AN OPEN-CYCLE GAS-CORE NUCLEAR ROCKET ENGINE.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, Ohio. Lewis Research Center
OSTI Identifier:
4113498
Report Number(s):
N-70-25447; NASA-TM-X-52775
NSA Number:
NSA-24-052973
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: UNCL. Orig. Receipt Date: 31-DEC-70
Country of Publication:
Country unknown/Code not available
Language:
English
Subject:
N38370* -Rocket & Space Reactors-Operation; GAS FUEL; LOSSES; PROPULSION; REACTOR CORE; REACTORS; ROCKETS; WEIGHT; NESDPS Office of Nuclear Energy Space and Defense Power Systems; REACTORS, ROCKET/weight of open-cycle gas core, effects of fuel loss rate on, (T); REACTORS, ROCKET/fuel loss rate for open-cycle gas core, (T); REACTORS, GAS-FUELED/fuel loss rate for open-cycle gas core, (T); REACTORS, GAS-FUELED/weight of open-cycle gas core, effects of fuel loss rate on, (T)

Citation Formats

Ragsdale, R.G. SOME FUEL LOSS RATE AND WEIGHT ESTIMATES OF AN OPEN-CYCLE GAS-CORE NUCLEAR ROCKET ENGINE.. Country unknown/Code not available: N. p., 1970. Web.
Ragsdale, R.G. SOME FUEL LOSS RATE AND WEIGHT ESTIMATES OF AN OPEN-CYCLE GAS-CORE NUCLEAR ROCKET ENGINE.. Country unknown/Code not available.
Ragsdale, R.G. Thu . "SOME FUEL LOSS RATE AND WEIGHT ESTIMATES OF AN OPEN-CYCLE GAS-CORE NUCLEAR ROCKET ENGINE.". Country unknown/Code not available. doi:.
@article{osti_4113498,
title = {SOME FUEL LOSS RATE AND WEIGHT ESTIMATES OF AN OPEN-CYCLE GAS-CORE NUCLEAR ROCKET ENGINE.},
author = {Ragsdale, R.G.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {Country unknown/Code not available},
year = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1970},
month = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1970}
}

Technical Report:
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  • A numerical investigation of the mixing of gaseous uranium and hydrogen inside an open-cycle gas core nuclear rocket engine (spherical geometry) is presented. The gaseous uranium fuel is injected near the centerline of the spherical engine cavity at a constant mass flow rate, and the hydrogen propellant is injected around the periphery of the engine at a five degree angle to the wall, at a constant mass flow rate. The main objective is to seek ways to minimize the mixing of uranium and hydrogen by choosing a suitable injector geometry for the mixing of light and heavy gas streams. Threemore » different uranium inlet areas are presented, and also three different turbulent models (k-{var_epsilon} model, RNG k-{var_epsilon} model, and RSM model) are investigated. The commercial CFD code, FLUENT, is used to model the flow field. Uranium mole fraction, axial mass flux, and radial mass flux contours are obtained. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}« less
  • Beginning in 1957 and continuing into the mid 1970s, the USSR conducted an extensive investigation into the use of both solid and gas core nuclear thermal rocket engines for space missions. During this time the scientific and engineering. problems associated with the development of a solid core engine were resolved. At the same time research was undertaken on a gas core engine, and some of the basic engineering problems associated with the concept were investigated. At the conclusion of the program, the basic principles of the solid core concept were established. However, a prototype solid core engine was not builtmore » because no established mission required such an engine. For the gas core concept, some of the basic physical processes involved were studied both theoretically and experimentally. However, no simple method of conducting proof-of-principle tests in a neutron flux was devised. This report focuses primarily on the development of the. gas core concept in the former USSR. A variety of gas core engine system parameters and designs are presented, along with a summary discussion of the basic physical principles and limitations involved in their design. The parallel development of the solid core concept is briefly described to provide an overall perspective of the magnitude of the nuclear thermal propulsion program and a technical comparison with the gas core concept.« less
  • Beginning in 1957 and continuing into the mid 1970s, the USSR conducted an extensive investigation into the use of both solid and gas core nuclear thermal rocket engines for space missions. During this time the scientific and engineering. problems associated with the development of a solid core engine were resolved. At the same time research was undertaken on a gas core engine, and some of the basic engineering problems associated with the concept were investigated. At the conclusion of the program, the basic principles of the solid core concept were established. However, a prototype solid core engine was not builtmore » because no established mission required such an engine. For the gas core concept, some of the basic physical processes involved were studied both theoretically and experimentally. However, no simple method of conducting proof-of-principle tests in a neutron flux was devised. This report focuses primarily on the development of the. gas core concept in the former USSR. A variety of gas core engine system parameters and designs are presented, along with a summary discussion of the basic physical principles and limitations involved in their design. The parallel development of the solid core concept is briefly described to provide an overall perspective of the magnitude of the nuclear thermal propulsion program and a technical comparison with the gas core concept.« less