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Title: Development of a compact 20 MeV gamma-ray source for energy calibration at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

Abstract

The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a real-time neutrino detector under construction near Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. SNO collaboration is developing various calibration sources in order to determine the detector response completely. This paper describes briefly the calibration sources being developed by the collaboration. One of these, a compact {sup 3}H(p,{gamma}){sup 4}He source, which produces 20-MeV {gamma}-rays, is described.

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Nuclear Physics Lab.
  2. British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Physics
  3. Ontario Hydro Technologies, Toronto, ON (Canada)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Nuclear Physics Lab.
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Research, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
406174
Report Number(s):
DOE/ER/40537-91; CONF-9504276-1
ON: DE96015186
DOE Contract Number:
FG06-90ER40537
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Particles and Cosmology conference, Kabardino-Balkaria (Russian Federation), 20-26 Apr 1995; Other Information: PBD: [1995]
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
66 PHYSICS; NEUTRINO DETECTION; SOLAR NEUTRINOS; SUDBURY NEUTRINO OBSERVATORY; CALIBRATION; GAMMA SOURCES

Citation Formats

Poon, A.W.P., Browne, M.C., Robertson, R.G.H., Waltham, C.E., and Kherani, N.P.. Development of a compact 20 MeV gamma-ray source for energy calibration at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Poon, A.W.P., Browne, M.C., Robertson, R.G.H., Waltham, C.E., & Kherani, N.P.. Development of a compact 20 MeV gamma-ray source for energy calibration at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. United States.
Poon, A.W.P., Browne, M.C., Robertson, R.G.H., Waltham, C.E., and Kherani, N.P.. Sun . "Development of a compact 20 MeV gamma-ray source for energy calibration at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/406174.
@article{osti_406174,
title = {Development of a compact 20 MeV gamma-ray source for energy calibration at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory},
author = {Poon, A.W.P. and Browne, M.C. and Robertson, R.G.H. and Waltham, C.E. and Kherani, N.P.},
abstractNote = {The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a real-time neutrino detector under construction near Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. SNO collaboration is developing various calibration sources in order to determine the detector response completely. This paper describes briefly the calibration sources being developed by the collaboration. One of these, a compact {sup 3}H(p,{gamma}){sup 4}He source, which produces 20-MeV {gamma}-rays, is described.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1995},
month = {Sun Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1995}
}

Conference:
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