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Title: Treatment of plutonium contaminated soil/sediment from the Mound site using the ACT*DE*CON{sup SM} process

Abstract

The removal and/or treatment of contaminated soil is a major problem facing the US DOE. The EG&G Mound Applied Technologies site in Miamisburg, Ohio, has an estimated 1.5 million cubic feet of soils from past disposal and waste burial practices awaiting remediation from plutonium contamination. This amount includes sediment from the Miami-Erie Canal that was contaminated in 1969 following a pipe- rupture accident. Conventional soil washing techniques that use particle separation would generate too large a waste volume to be economically feasible. Therefore, innovative technologies are needed for the cleanup. The ACT*DE*CON process was developed by SELENTEC for washing soils to selectively dissolve and remove heavy metals and radionuclides. ACT*DE*CON chemically dissolves and removes heavy metals and radionuclides from soils and sediments into an aqueous medium. The ACT*DE*CON process uses oxidative carbonate/chelant chemistry to dissolve the contaminant from the sediment and hold the contaminant in solution. The objective of recent work was to document the proves conditions necessary to achieve the Mound-site and regulatory-cleanup goals using the ACT*DE*CON technology.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)
  2. SELENTEC, Atlanta, GA (United States)
  3. Rust Remedial Service, Inc., Anderson, SC (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
397165
Report Number(s):
ANL/ES/CP-90891; CONF-960804-55
ON: DE96013955; TRN: 97:000029
DOE Contract Number:
W-31109-ENG-38
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: SPECTRUM `96: international conference on nuclear and hazardous waste management, Seattle, WA (United States), 18-23 Aug 1996; Other Information: PBD: [1996]
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 40 CHEMISTRY; 05 NUCLEAR FUELS; SOILS; CONTAMINATION; REMEDIAL ACTION; RADIOISOTOPES; REMOVAL; METALS; SEDIMENTS; SILT; DISSOLUTION; SEPARATION PROCESSES; RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT

Citation Formats

Negri, M.C., Swift, N.A., and North, J.P.. Treatment of plutonium contaminated soil/sediment from the Mound site using the ACT*DE*CON{sup SM} process. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Negri, M.C., Swift, N.A., & North, J.P.. Treatment of plutonium contaminated soil/sediment from the Mound site using the ACT*DE*CON{sup SM} process. United States.
Negri, M.C., Swift, N.A., and North, J.P.. 1996. "Treatment of plutonium contaminated soil/sediment from the Mound site using the ACT*DE*CON{sup SM} process". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/397165.
@article{osti_397165,
title = {Treatment of plutonium contaminated soil/sediment from the Mound site using the ACT*DE*CON{sup SM} process},
author = {Negri, M.C. and Swift, N.A. and North, J.P.},
abstractNote = {The removal and/or treatment of contaminated soil is a major problem facing the US DOE. The EG&G Mound Applied Technologies site in Miamisburg, Ohio, has an estimated 1.5 million cubic feet of soils from past disposal and waste burial practices awaiting remediation from plutonium contamination. This amount includes sediment from the Miami-Erie Canal that was contaminated in 1969 following a pipe- rupture accident. Conventional soil washing techniques that use particle separation would generate too large a waste volume to be economically feasible. Therefore, innovative technologies are needed for the cleanup. The ACT*DE*CON process was developed by SELENTEC for washing soils to selectively dissolve and remove heavy metals and radionuclides. ACT*DE*CON chemically dissolves and removes heavy metals and radionuclides from soils and sediments into an aqueous medium. The ACT*DE*CON process uses oxidative carbonate/chelant chemistry to dissolve the contaminant from the sediment and hold the contaminant in solution. The objective of recent work was to document the proves conditions necessary to achieve the Mound-site and regulatory-cleanup goals using the ACT*DE*CON technology.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1996,
month =
}

Conference:
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  • A treatability test was run during the summer and fall of 1997 to demonstrate the effectiveness of ACT*DE*CON for removing plutonium and thorium from the clay soils around Mound. ACT*DE*CON is a proprietary solution patented by Selentec. The process utilized a highly selective dissolution of the contaminants by the use of a chemical wash. The pilot scale process involved pretreatment of the soil in an attrition scrubber with ACT*DE*CON solution. This blended solution was then passed through a counter-current extraction chamber where additional contact with ACT*DE*CON solution occurred, followed by a rinse cycle. During this process sand was added tomore » aid contact of the solution with the soil particles. The sand is removed during the rinse step and reused. The chelating agent is separated from the contaminant and recycled back into the process, along with the reverse osmosis permeate. The resulting solution can be further treated to concentrate the contaminant. Three different types of environmental soils were tested -- plutonium and thorium contaminated soils with the natural clay content, and plutonium contaminated soils with a high percentage of fine clay particles. The goal of these tests was to reduce the plutonium levels from several hundreds of pCi/g to between 25 and 75 pCi/g and the thorium from a couple hundred pCi/g to less than 5 pCi/g. The results of these four tests are presented along with a discussion of the operating parameters and the lessons learned relating to full scale implementation at Mound as well as other potential applications of this process.« less
  • The 232-Z facility at Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant operated as a plutonium scrap incinerator for 11 years. Its mission was to recover residual plutonium through incinerating and/or leaching contaminated wastes and scrap material. Equipment failures, as well as spills, resulted in the release of radionuclides and other contamination to the building, along with small amounts to external soil. Based on the potential threat posed by the residual plutonium, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued an Action Memorandum to demolish Building 232-2, Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation, and Liability Act (CERC1.A) Non-Time Critical Removal Action Memorandum for Removal of the 232-2more » Waste Recovery Process Facility at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (04-AMCP-0486).« less
  • The Longue Pointe site is in Montreal, Canada and involves the treatment of approximately 115,000 tonnes of soil (dry) containing hazardous quantities of Ph (2,000 to 30,000 ppm), making this the largest soil treatment project of its kind in North America. The site had become contaminated through both automotive battery recycling operations which contributed substantial coarse Ph contamination and a secondary lead smelter which contributed extensive fine lead fly ash contamination. The soil is also a high clay matrix (50% clay of size < 5 {micro}m) and approximately 80% of the lead resides in this fine soil fraction. Conventional soilmore » washing/volume reduction was thus shown to have very limited utility. The authors are currently operating an 800 tons per day treatment plant on the site which provides recovery of coarse lead by advanced soil washing and gravity separation techniques and extraction and recovery of fine lead by hydrometallurgical techniques. Recovered lead products are recycled in the base metal industry whereas treated soil with residual concentrations of < 500 ppm or < 900 ppm Ph (area dependent) is reused as backfill on the site. The site is bordered by residential areas and is enjoying continued use for military activities. The project has demonstrated the merits of full treatment and reuse of treated soil.« less
  • Over one thousand gallons of tritiated oil, at various contamination levels, are stored in the Main Hill Tritium Facility at the Miamisburg Environmental Management Project (MEMP), commonly referred to as Mound Site. This tritiated oil is to be characterized for hazardous materials and radioactive contamination. Most of the hazardous materials are expected to be in the form of heavy metals, i.e., mercury, silver, lead, chromium, etc, but transuranic materials and PCBs could also be in some oils. Waste oils, found to contain heavy metals as well as being radioactively contaminated, are considered as mixed wastes and are controlled by Resourcemore » Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations. The SAMMS (Self-Assembled Mercaptan on Mesoporous Silica) technology was developed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for removal and stabilization of RCRA metals (i.e., lead, mercury, cadmium, silver, etc.) and for removal of mercury from organic solvents. The SAMMS material is based on self-assembly of functionalized monolayers on mesoporous oxide surfaces. The unique mesoporous oxide supports provide a high surface area, thereby enhancing the metal-loading capacity. SAMMS material has high flexibility in that it binds with different forms of mercury, including metallic, inorganic, organic, charged, and neutral compounds. The material removes mercury from both organic wastes, such as pump oils, and from aqueous wastes. Mercury-loaded SAMMS not only passes TCLP tests, but also has good long-term durability as a waste form because: (1) the covalent binding between mercury and SAMMS has good resistance in ion-exchange, oxidation, and hydrolysis over a wide pH range and (2) the uniform and small pore size of the mesoporous silica prevents bacteria from solubilizing the bound mercury.« less
  • The treatment of contaminated soil presents a significant technical problem. Soil-washing and chemical-extraction methods have proven to be effective for specific applications, but a process with more comprehensive treatment properties that is both cost-effective and environmentally propitious is needed. Bradtec, Inc., has developed a process, the ACT*DE*CON{sup SM} process, that has been tested on soil contaminated with plutonium. The process effectively extracted Pu-238 after three washes, reducing the contamination levels from approximately 20 Bq/g to 1.6--1.9 Bq/g and yielding a decontamination factor ranging from 11 to 13. By using four or more ACT*DE*CON{sup SM} washes or a continuous-flow process withmore » ACT*DE*CON{sup SM} solvents on a pilot-scale test, a target decontamination level of 0.93 Bq/g might be achievable.« less