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Title: Isolation and use of indigenous bacteria for bioremediation of soil from a former wood treatment site in southwestern Alaska

Abstract

A temporary wood treatment site located at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) Palmer Research Farm, Point MacKenzie Agricultural Project was operated during the summer months of 1988--1989. An undefined mixture of diesel fuel, creosote, and pentachlorophenol (PCP) was used in the process. Approximately 75 m{sup 3} (98 yd{sup 3}) of soil were contaminated with up to 13.5 ppm PCP, creosote, and 13,000 ppm diesel range hydrocarbons. The Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation (ADEC) established clean-up levels of 0.5 ppm for PCP, and 1,000 ppm for diesel range hydrocarbons. The contaminated soil was excavated and stored on site in lined cells pending selection and implementation of a remediation method. Physical and chemical treatment options for soil contaminated with xenobiotic compounds in the Lower 48 United States are often not available or economical in Alaska. The expense of shipping contaminated soil outside the state for treatment, difficulties in supporting complex remediation technologies in remote locations, and concerns over long-term liability associated with landfilling make biological treatment, when feasible, a compelling option in Alaska. Therefore, it was determined that studies should be conducted to address the feasibility of bioremediating the Pt. MacKenzie soil.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
395276
Report Number(s):
CONF-9505206-
Journal ID: ISSN 0073-7682; TRN: IM9648%%399
Resource Type:
Book
Resource Relation:
Conference: 50. Purdue industrial waste conference, W. Lafayette, IN (United States), 8-10 May 1995; Other Information: PBD: 1996; Related Information: Is Part Of Proceedings of the 50. industrial waste conference; Wukasch, R.F. [ed.]; PB: 861 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ALASKA; INDUSTRIAL PLANTS; REMEDIAL ACTION; DIESEL FUELS; BIODEGRADATION; CREOSOTE; PHENOLS; WOOD PRODUCTS INDUSTRY; FEASIBILITY STUDIES; SAMPLING; SOIL CHEMISTRY; METABOLISM; CONTINUOUS CULTURE; MICROORGANISMS; EXPERIMENTAL DATA

Citation Formats

Guinn, D.A., Tumeo, M.A., and Braddock, J.F.. Isolation and use of indigenous bacteria for bioremediation of soil from a former wood treatment site in southwestern Alaska. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Guinn, D.A., Tumeo, M.A., & Braddock, J.F.. Isolation and use of indigenous bacteria for bioremediation of soil from a former wood treatment site in southwestern Alaska. United States.
Guinn, D.A., Tumeo, M.A., and Braddock, J.F.. 1996. "Isolation and use of indigenous bacteria for bioremediation of soil from a former wood treatment site in southwestern Alaska". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_395276,
title = {Isolation and use of indigenous bacteria for bioremediation of soil from a former wood treatment site in southwestern Alaska},
author = {Guinn, D.A. and Tumeo, M.A. and Braddock, J.F.},
abstractNote = {A temporary wood treatment site located at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) Palmer Research Farm, Point MacKenzie Agricultural Project was operated during the summer months of 1988--1989. An undefined mixture of diesel fuel, creosote, and pentachlorophenol (PCP) was used in the process. Approximately 75 m{sup 3} (98 yd{sup 3}) of soil were contaminated with up to 13.5 ppm PCP, creosote, and 13,000 ppm diesel range hydrocarbons. The Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation (ADEC) established clean-up levels of 0.5 ppm for PCP, and 1,000 ppm for diesel range hydrocarbons. The contaminated soil was excavated and stored on site in lined cells pending selection and implementation of a remediation method. Physical and chemical treatment options for soil contaminated with xenobiotic compounds in the Lower 48 United States are often not available or economical in Alaska. The expense of shipping contaminated soil outside the state for treatment, difficulties in supporting complex remediation technologies in remote locations, and concerns over long-term liability associated with landfilling make biological treatment, when feasible, a compelling option in Alaska. Therefore, it was determined that studies should be conducted to address the feasibility of bioremediating the Pt. MacKenzie soil.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1996,
month =
}

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