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Title: Algae control problems and practices workshop

Abstract

Western water resources are continuously facing increased demand from industry and the public. Consequently, many of these resources are required to perform multiple tasks as they cycle through the ecosystem. Many plants and animals depend upon these resources for growth. Algae are one group of plants associated with nutrient and energy cycles in many aquatic ecosystems. Although most freshwater algae are microscopic in size, they are capable of dominating and proliferating to the extent that the value of the water resource for both industrial and domestic needs is compromised. There is a great diversity of aquatic environments and systems in which algae may be found, and there are many varieties of treatment and control techniques available to reduce the impacts of excessive growth. This workshop was organized to exchange information about these control problems and practices.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
  2. Pacific Gas and Electric Co., San Francisco, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
390414
Report Number(s):
INEL-96/00213; CONF-9603195-1
ON: DE96014089
DOE Contract Number:
AC07-94ID13223
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Nonindigenous species in western aquatic ecosystems, Portland, OR (United States), 27-29 Mar 1996; Other Information: PBD: [1996]
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 13 HYDRO ENERGY; BIOLOGICAL FOULING; MEETINGS; ALGAE; WATER QUALITY; AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS; WATER RESOURCES; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; HERBICIDES; ANTIFOULANTS

Citation Formats

Pryfogle, P.A., and Ghio, G. Algae control problems and practices workshop. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Pryfogle, P.A., & Ghio, G. Algae control problems and practices workshop. United States.
Pryfogle, P.A., and Ghio, G. 1996. "Algae control problems and practices workshop". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/390414.
@article{osti_390414,
title = {Algae control problems and practices workshop},
author = {Pryfogle, P.A. and Ghio, G.},
abstractNote = {Western water resources are continuously facing increased demand from industry and the public. Consequently, many of these resources are required to perform multiple tasks as they cycle through the ecosystem. Many plants and animals depend upon these resources for growth. Algae are one group of plants associated with nutrient and energy cycles in many aquatic ecosystems. Although most freshwater algae are microscopic in size, they are capable of dominating and proliferating to the extent that the value of the water resource for both industrial and domestic needs is compromised. There is a great diversity of aquatic environments and systems in which algae may be found, and there are many varieties of treatment and control techniques available to reduce the impacts of excessive growth. This workshop was organized to exchange information about these control problems and practices.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1996,
month = 9
}

Conference:
Other availability
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