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Title: Monitoring polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in stream stormwater runoff to meet EPA`s water quality objectives

Abstract

The detections of individual polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in stormwater runoff in streams are not easily quantified because of low concentrations, large concentration variability, and poor detection limits using EPA methods. In order to reliably compare PAH concentrations with EPA`s water quality objectives (WQO), the authors used a sophisticated low level GC-MS/SIM method developed at the Texas A and M geochemical environmental research laboratory to analyze runoff samples for 39 individual PAH compounds at ppt levels. In Alameda County (CA), they collected storm runoff samples from 3 stream stations (San Lorenzo, Castro Valley, and Alameda Creek) over a 3 year period. Total PAH concentrations were directly measured, while dissolved PAH concentrations were estimated from the relationship, Mass{sub total} = Mass{sub dissolved}[(K{sub d} {times} Tot.Suspended.Solids {times} 10{sup {minus}6}) + 1]. Both total and dissolved PAH concentrations were used to compare with the EPA WQOs for protection of human health. For the 4 noncarcinogenic PAHs (fluorene, anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene), neither the total nor dissolved concentrations exceeded WQOs for all storm events and all 3 stream stations. For the 7 carcinogenic PAHs (benzo(a)anthracene, chrysene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, benzo(a)pyrene, indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene, and dibenzo(ah)anthracene), total concentrations exceeded the WQO much more frequently than the dissolved concentrations.more » Based on the dissolved fraction, which they believe is a more representative comparison, samples from San Lorenzo and Alameda Creeks had either none or only one exceedance. These stations drain relatively open areas and it appears that PAH levels in the runoff are at relatively safe levels. In contrast, Castro Valley samples showed that 25--38% of the samples for dissolved PAH (chrysene and benzo(a)anthracene) concentrations exceeded WQO.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Harding Lawson Associates, Novato, CA (United States)
  2. Woodward-Clyde Consultants, Oakland, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
390151
Report Number(s):
CONF-9511137-
ISBN 1-880611-03-1; TRN: IM9646%%436
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 2. Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) world conference, Vancouver (Canada), 5-9 Nov 1995; Other Information: PBD: 1995; Related Information: Is Part Of Second SETAC world congress (16. annual meeting): Abstract book. Global environmental protection: Science, politics, and common sense; PB: 378 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CALIFORNIA; WATER POLLUTION; STREAMS; POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; RUNOFF; MONITORING; GEOGRAPHICAL VARIATIONS

Citation Formats

Lee, C C, and Cooke, T D. Monitoring polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in stream stormwater runoff to meet EPA`s water quality objectives. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Lee, C C, & Cooke, T D. Monitoring polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in stream stormwater runoff to meet EPA`s water quality objectives. United States.
Lee, C C, and Cooke, T D. Sun . "Monitoring polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in stream stormwater runoff to meet EPA`s water quality objectives". United States.
@article{osti_390151,
title = {Monitoring polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in stream stormwater runoff to meet EPA`s water quality objectives},
author = {Lee, C C and Cooke, T D},
abstractNote = {The detections of individual polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in stormwater runoff in streams are not easily quantified because of low concentrations, large concentration variability, and poor detection limits using EPA methods. In order to reliably compare PAH concentrations with EPA`s water quality objectives (WQO), the authors used a sophisticated low level GC-MS/SIM method developed at the Texas A and M geochemical environmental research laboratory to analyze runoff samples for 39 individual PAH compounds at ppt levels. In Alameda County (CA), they collected storm runoff samples from 3 stream stations (San Lorenzo, Castro Valley, and Alameda Creek) over a 3 year period. Total PAH concentrations were directly measured, while dissolved PAH concentrations were estimated from the relationship, Mass{sub total} = Mass{sub dissolved}[(K{sub d} {times} Tot.Suspended.Solids {times} 10{sup {minus}6}) + 1]. Both total and dissolved PAH concentrations were used to compare with the EPA WQOs for protection of human health. For the 4 noncarcinogenic PAHs (fluorene, anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene), neither the total nor dissolved concentrations exceeded WQOs for all storm events and all 3 stream stations. For the 7 carcinogenic PAHs (benzo(a)anthracene, chrysene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, benzo(a)pyrene, indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene, and dibenzo(ah)anthracene), total concentrations exceeded the WQO much more frequently than the dissolved concentrations. Based on the dissolved fraction, which they believe is a more representative comparison, samples from San Lorenzo and Alameda Creeks had either none or only one exceedance. These stations drain relatively open areas and it appears that PAH levels in the runoff are at relatively safe levels. In contrast, Castro Valley samples showed that 25--38% of the samples for dissolved PAH (chrysene and benzo(a)anthracene) concentrations exceeded WQO.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/390151}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1995},
month = {12}
}

Conference:
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