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Title: Sealing ducts to save energy

Abstract

Large amounts of energy are wasted when heat leaks through ductwork located in uninsulated spaces. The Electric Power Research INstitute recently did a study that accurately measured these losses, then substantially reduced them by sealing the leaky ductwork. Six homes in the Pacific Northwest with significant duct leakage to the outside were selected for the study. The homes had electric resistance or heat pump, forced-air heating systems with a major portion of the supply and return ductwork in crawl spaces, attics, garages, etc. Measurements of duct leakage and heating system efficiency were done on all the homes before starting the duct sealing. Retrofitting included finding holes, gaps, cracks and disconnected joints in supply and return ducts as well as in plenums. When necessary, plenums were cut open for repairs. Leaks were sealed with Latex mastic and fiberglass tape. Outside ducts were covered or wrapped with insulation. Unducted returns were sealed with duct board. In some cases, leakage was corrected by merely reconnecting ducts and boots.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
376809
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Public Power
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 54; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: PBD: Jul-Aug 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; DUCTS; SEALS; ENERGY CONSERVATION; SEALING MATERIALS

Citation Formats

Siuru, B. Sealing ducts to save energy. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Siuru, B. Sealing ducts to save energy. United States.
Siuru, B. Mon . "Sealing ducts to save energy". United States.
@article{osti_376809,
title = {Sealing ducts to save energy},
author = {Siuru, B.},
abstractNote = {Large amounts of energy are wasted when heat leaks through ductwork located in uninsulated spaces. The Electric Power Research INstitute recently did a study that accurately measured these losses, then substantially reduced them by sealing the leaky ductwork. Six homes in the Pacific Northwest with significant duct leakage to the outside were selected for the study. The homes had electric resistance or heat pump, forced-air heating systems with a major portion of the supply and return ductwork in crawl spaces, attics, garages, etc. Measurements of duct leakage and heating system efficiency were done on all the homes before starting the duct sealing. Retrofitting included finding holes, gaps, cracks and disconnected joints in supply and return ducts as well as in plenums. When necessary, plenums were cut open for repairs. Leaks were sealed with Latex mastic and fiberglass tape. Outside ducts were covered or wrapped with insulation. Unducted returns were sealed with duct board. In some cases, leakage was corrected by merely reconnecting ducts and boots.},
doi = {},
journal = {Public Power},
number = 4,
volume = 54,
place = {United States},
year = {1996},
month = {7}
}