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Title: Side mounted EMS for aluminium scrap melters

Abstract

Normally the electromagnetic stirrer (EMS) is placed below the furnace. However it has recently been found that the EMS can also be placed at the side of the furnace, still giving good stirring. This makes it possible to install EMS on most existing furnaces. The side-mounted EMS is compared with the standard bottom-mounted stirrer with respect to installation, melting time and flow pattern in the melt. The major conclusion is that a side-mounted EMS is practical and will give about as good a performance as the bottom-mounted. Melting time estimates are based upon 3-D fluid flow and heat transfer predictions in combination with a simplified scrap melting theory. Predicted melting times are in fair agreement with operational data for mechanically stirred and electromagnetically bottom stirred furnaces.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. ABB Industrial Systems AB, Vaesteraas (Sweden)
  2. ABB Industrial Systems Inc., Brewster, NY (United States). Metals Div.
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
372047
Report Number(s):
CONF-960202-
ISBN 0-87339-312-0; TRN: IM9641%%124
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Annual meeting and exhibition of the Minerals, Metals and Materials Society (TMS), Anaheim, CA (United States), 4-8 Feb 1996; Other Information: PBD: 1996; Related Information: Is Part Of Light metals 1996; Hale, W. [ed.] [Anglesey Aluminum Metal Ltd., North Wales (United Kingdom)]; PB: 1304 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ALUMINIUM; STIRRING; LIQUID METALS; ELECTROMAGNETISM; DESIGN; MELTING; FLUID FLOW; TIME DEPENDENCE; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; PREDICTION EQUATIONS; ELECTRIC CURRENTS; HEAT TRANSFER; THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY; MAGNETIC FIELDS

Citation Formats

Eidem, M., Tallbaeck, G., and Hanley, P.J.. Side mounted EMS for aluminium scrap melters. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Eidem, M., Tallbaeck, G., & Hanley, P.J.. Side mounted EMS for aluminium scrap melters. United States.
Eidem, M., Tallbaeck, G., and Hanley, P.J.. 1996. "Side mounted EMS for aluminium scrap melters". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_372047,
title = {Side mounted EMS for aluminium scrap melters},
author = {Eidem, M. and Tallbaeck, G. and Hanley, P.J.},
abstractNote = {Normally the electromagnetic stirrer (EMS) is placed below the furnace. However it has recently been found that the EMS can also be placed at the side of the furnace, still giving good stirring. This makes it possible to install EMS on most existing furnaces. The side-mounted EMS is compared with the standard bottom-mounted stirrer with respect to installation, melting time and flow pattern in the melt. The major conclusion is that a side-mounted EMS is practical and will give about as good a performance as the bottom-mounted. Melting time estimates are based upon 3-D fluid flow and heat transfer predictions in combination with a simplified scrap melting theory. Predicted melting times are in fair agreement with operational data for mechanically stirred and electromagnetically bottom stirred furnaces.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1996,
month =
}

Conference:
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