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Title: Stripping and cleaning of photoresist using low energy neutrals

Abstract

Experimental studies of a broad-area hyperthermal neutral stream source for photoresist cleaning are reported. Low energy neutrals are generated from a high-density inductively coupled plasma by the surface reflection neutralization method. Rates of removal of photoresist polymers such as polymethyl methacrylate as functions of the hyperthermal translational energy and background neutral pressure are reported. The results demonstrate this low energy neutral source provides controllable fast neutrals for cleaning applications. {ital Ex situ} and {ital in situ} measurements yield typical removal rates of about 10 {Angstrom}/{ital s} without stream collimation. The removal rates at increasing pressures show a trade-off between creating higher density plasma, leading to a greater initial neutral flux and attenuation of neutrals due to collisions. These observations are in good agreement with previous Monte Carlo simulations. The removal rate increases linearly with rf power and is nearly constant as the neutral energy is varied by varying the reflector bias. One consequence of neutral directionality in collimated stream applications is the presence of unremoved carbon compounds on the sidewalls as indicated by angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. Department of Applied Science, The College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia 23187 (United States)
  2. Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87110 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
362666
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Applied Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 86; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: PBD: Sep 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
40 CHEMISTRY; 70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION; POLYMERS; PLASMA; ETCHING; SURFACE CLEANING; PMMA; PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY; STRIPPING

Citation Formats

Tang, X., Nichols, C.A., and Manos, D.M. Stripping and cleaning of photoresist using low energy neutrals. United States: N. p., 1999. Web. doi:10.1063/1.371070.
Tang, X., Nichols, C.A., & Manos, D.M. Stripping and cleaning of photoresist using low energy neutrals. United States. doi:10.1063/1.371070.
Tang, X., Nichols, C.A., and Manos, D.M. Wed . "Stripping and cleaning of photoresist using low energy neutrals". United States. doi:10.1063/1.371070.
@article{osti_362666,
title = {Stripping and cleaning of photoresist using low energy neutrals},
author = {Tang, X. and Nichols, C.A. and Manos, D.M.},
abstractNote = {Experimental studies of a broad-area hyperthermal neutral stream source for photoresist cleaning are reported. Low energy neutrals are generated from a high-density inductively coupled plasma by the surface reflection neutralization method. Rates of removal of photoresist polymers such as polymethyl methacrylate as functions of the hyperthermal translational energy and background neutral pressure are reported. The results demonstrate this low energy neutral source provides controllable fast neutrals for cleaning applications. {ital Ex situ} and {ital in situ} measurements yield typical removal rates of about 10 {Angstrom}/{ital s} without stream collimation. The removal rates at increasing pressures show a trade-off between creating higher density plasma, leading to a greater initial neutral flux and attenuation of neutrals due to collisions. These observations are in good agreement with previous Monte Carlo simulations. The removal rate increases linearly with rf power and is nearly constant as the neutral energy is varied by varying the reflector bias. One consequence of neutral directionality in collimated stream applications is the presence of unremoved carbon compounds on the sidewalls as indicated by angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}},
doi = {10.1063/1.371070},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 5,
volume = 86,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {9}
}