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Title: Multipurpose water heater. Final technical report, October 1995--August 1997

Abstract

This final report describes SBIR Phase 2 project for the development of a multi-purpose water heater for use in Army Food sanitation centers. The objective of the project was to develop a water heater--powered only by an M2 burner and requiring no external supply of electricity--capable of supplying a continuous flow of pressurized hot water to a faucet at the sanitation sink. In the course of the research, two developments took place that have had an impact on the final design. First, the Multifuel Burner Unit (MBU) became available as a potential replacement for the M2. The MBU runs on JP-8 or diesel fuel and requires an external 24-volt VDC power supply. Thus, in anticipation of eventual conversion from M2 to MBU, a DC-Powered Water Heater was also delivered. Second, a new method for heating water in the sanitation sinks was developed allowing three sinks to be heated by a single M2 or MBU.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Yankee Scientific, Inc., Medfield, MA (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
362272
Report Number(s):
AD-A-361559/XAB; NATICK/TR-99/019
CNN: Contract DAAK60-95-C-2020; TRN: 91440793
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Mar 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; HOT WATER; WATER HEATERS; ENERGY CONSERVATION; FUEL SUBSTITUTION; DC SYSTEMS; MILITARY FACILITIES; FOOD PROCESSING

Citation Formats

Guyer, E.C., and Coumou, K.G. Multipurpose water heater. Final technical report, October 1995--August 1997. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Guyer, E.C., & Coumou, K.G. Multipurpose water heater. Final technical report, October 1995--August 1997. United States.
Guyer, E.C., and Coumou, K.G. 1999. "Multipurpose water heater. Final technical report, October 1995--August 1997". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_362272,
title = {Multipurpose water heater. Final technical report, October 1995--August 1997},
author = {Guyer, E.C. and Coumou, K.G.},
abstractNote = {This final report describes SBIR Phase 2 project for the development of a multi-purpose water heater for use in Army Food sanitation centers. The objective of the project was to develop a water heater--powered only by an M2 burner and requiring no external supply of electricity--capable of supplying a continuous flow of pressurized hot water to a faucet at the sanitation sink. In the course of the research, two developments took place that have had an impact on the final design. First, the Multifuel Burner Unit (MBU) became available as a potential replacement for the M2. The MBU runs on JP-8 or diesel fuel and requires an external 24-volt VDC power supply. Thus, in anticipation of eventual conversion from M2 to MBU, a DC-Powered Water Heater was also delivered. Second, a new method for heating water in the sanitation sinks was developed allowing three sinks to be heated by a single M2 or MBU.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1999,
month = 3
}

Technical Report:
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