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Title: Duty cycle effects on small engine emissions

Abstract

The paper presents emissions data obtained from seven lawn mower engines that were tested using three duty cycles: a six mode steady-state test, a quasi-steady-state test, and a transient test. A comparison of emissions from the three duty cycles is made for non-methane organic gases, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, detailed hydrocarbons (percent of total organic emissions that are paraffin, olefin, aromatic, or acetylene), and toxic compounds (benzene, 1,3-butadiene, formaldehyde, and acetaldehyde). Differences in ozone potential are also determined and reported for each duty cycle. The study includes both regulated and unregulated (not certified to any emission standard) test engines that have a wide range of emission rates. Results indicate that regulated emission rate differences due to duty cycle are fairly small (less than ten percent on the average). For over half of the regulated emissions data, there is no significant difference in emission rates between data obtained using the steady-state and the transient duty cycle. Emission comparisons are even better between the quasi-steady-state and steady-state data. Ozone potential and toxic emissions are ten to twenty percent higher with the transient test cycle and organic composition appears unaffected by duty cycle selection.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
362041
Report Number(s):
CONF-980632-
TRN: IM9933%%425
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 91. annual meeting and exhibition of the Air and Waste Management Association, San Diego, CA (United States), 14-18 Jun 1998; Other Information: PBD: 1998; Related Information: Is Part Of Proceedings of the 91. annual meeting and exhibition. Bridging international boundaries: Clean production for environmental stewardship; PB: [5000] p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AIR POLLUTION; EMISSION; EXHAUST GASES; METHANE; CARBON MONOXIDE; NITROGEN OXIDES; HYDROCARBONS; BENZENE; BUTADIENE; FORMALDEHYDE; ACETALDEHYDE; OZONE

Citation Formats

Gabele, P. Duty cycle effects on small engine emissions. United States: N. p., 1998. Web.
Gabele, P. Duty cycle effects on small engine emissions. United States.
Gabele, P. Thu . "Duty cycle effects on small engine emissions". United States.
@article{osti_362041,
title = {Duty cycle effects on small engine emissions},
author = {Gabele, P},
abstractNote = {The paper presents emissions data obtained from seven lawn mower engines that were tested using three duty cycles: a six mode steady-state test, a quasi-steady-state test, and a transient test. A comparison of emissions from the three duty cycles is made for non-methane organic gases, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, detailed hydrocarbons (percent of total organic emissions that are paraffin, olefin, aromatic, or acetylene), and toxic compounds (benzene, 1,3-butadiene, formaldehyde, and acetaldehyde). Differences in ozone potential are also determined and reported for each duty cycle. The study includes both regulated and unregulated (not certified to any emission standard) test engines that have a wide range of emission rates. Results indicate that regulated emission rate differences due to duty cycle are fairly small (less than ten percent on the average). For over half of the regulated emissions data, there is no significant difference in emission rates between data obtained using the steady-state and the transient duty cycle. Emission comparisons are even better between the quasi-steady-state and steady-state data. Ozone potential and toxic emissions are ten to twenty percent higher with the transient test cycle and organic composition appears unaffected by duty cycle selection.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1998},
month = {12}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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