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Title: Enhanced bioremediation process: A case study of effectiveness on PAH contamination in soils at a former wood-treating site

Abstract

The Enhanced Bioremediation Process (EBP) technology is an exsitu biodegradation process that utilizes bacterial and fungal inoculants to effectively oxidize and bioremediate persistent hard to degrade organics in contaminated soils. The EBP fungal inoculants produce highly reactive extracellular peroxidase enzymes that can oxidize and degrade lignin, a complex, natural polymer composed of phenylpropane units that is resistant to decay. The lignin peroxidase enzymes are highly nonspecific because of their ability to oxidize the heterogenic lignin molecule, and are capable of degrading a wide variety of complex organic compounds. Because the chemical sub-structure of lignin (1,2-aryl diethers, alkyl sidechains and connected aryl systems) resembles that of many persistent organic compounds, the EBP inoculants are very effective in biodegrading similar hazardous organic pollutants in contaminated soils. As an inadvertent by-product of these biochemical processes, the EBP organisms reduce the organic constituents to a soluble form. In a soluble form, the indigenous organisms can further degrade the contaminants. The technology is applied in such a manner as to maximize the activity of the indigenous organisms by establishing optimum growth conditions. The efficacy of the EBP technology in degrading persistent environmental pollutants has been documented at both the bench scale and pilot demonstration levels.more » A recently completed field pilot demonstration was conducted at a creosote contaminated site. The demonstration entailed the treatment of approximately 700 tons of soil contaminated with PAH constituents. Laboratory analyses of pre and post-treated soils indicate that total average PAH concentrations in many samples were reduced by greater than 91 percent over a two month treatment period.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Miltech Environmental, Inc., Tucker, GA (United States)
  2. Dames and Moore, Baton Rouge, LA (United States)
  3. EMCON, Norcross, GA (United States)
  4. Georgia Dept. of Transportation, Forest Park, GA (United States). Office of Materials and Research
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
354300
Report Number(s):
CONF-970677-
TRN: IM9930%%41
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 90. annual meeting and exhibition of the Air and Waste Management Association, Toronto (Canada), 8-13 Jun 1997; Other Information: PBD: 1997; Related Information: Is Part Of 1997 proceedings of the Air and Waste Management Association`s 90. annual meeting and exhibition; PB: [7000] p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; REMEDIAL ACTION; SOILS; BIODEGRADATION; POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT; INDUSTRIAL WASTES

Citation Formats

Mills, W F, Matens, B L, Buchalter, D S, and Montgomery, D N. Enhanced bioremediation process: A case study of effectiveness on PAH contamination in soils at a former wood-treating site. United States: N. p., 1997. Web.
Mills, W F, Matens, B L, Buchalter, D S, & Montgomery, D N. Enhanced bioremediation process: A case study of effectiveness on PAH contamination in soils at a former wood-treating site. United States.
Mills, W F, Matens, B L, Buchalter, D S, and Montgomery, D N. Wed . "Enhanced bioremediation process: A case study of effectiveness on PAH contamination in soils at a former wood-treating site". United States.
@article{osti_354300,
title = {Enhanced bioremediation process: A case study of effectiveness on PAH contamination in soils at a former wood-treating site},
author = {Mills, W F and Matens, B L and Buchalter, D S and Montgomery, D N},
abstractNote = {The Enhanced Bioremediation Process (EBP) technology is an exsitu biodegradation process that utilizes bacterial and fungal inoculants to effectively oxidize and bioremediate persistent hard to degrade organics in contaminated soils. The EBP fungal inoculants produce highly reactive extracellular peroxidase enzymes that can oxidize and degrade lignin, a complex, natural polymer composed of phenylpropane units that is resistant to decay. The lignin peroxidase enzymes are highly nonspecific because of their ability to oxidize the heterogenic lignin molecule, and are capable of degrading a wide variety of complex organic compounds. Because the chemical sub-structure of lignin (1,2-aryl diethers, alkyl sidechains and connected aryl systems) resembles that of many persistent organic compounds, the EBP inoculants are very effective in biodegrading similar hazardous organic pollutants in contaminated soils. As an inadvertent by-product of these biochemical processes, the EBP organisms reduce the organic constituents to a soluble form. In a soluble form, the indigenous organisms can further degrade the contaminants. The technology is applied in such a manner as to maximize the activity of the indigenous organisms by establishing optimum growth conditions. The efficacy of the EBP technology in degrading persistent environmental pollutants has been documented at both the bench scale and pilot demonstration levels. A recently completed field pilot demonstration was conducted at a creosote contaminated site. The demonstration entailed the treatment of approximately 700 tons of soil contaminated with PAH constituents. Laboratory analyses of pre and post-treated soils indicate that total average PAH concentrations in many samples were reduced by greater than 91 percent over a two month treatment period.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/354300}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1997},
month = {12}
}

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