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Title: Comparison of air emissions from various operating scenarios using an environmental database management system

Abstract

In their continuing effort to reduce air emissions, chemical and petroleum processing facilities must be able to predict, analyze, and compare emissions which result from a variety of operating scenarios. Will the use of a more expensive, yet cleaner fuel improve air emissions enough to warrant the extra cost? What are the threshold levels of production that will push a facility`s air emissions out of compliance with regulated limits? Which raw materials have the most prominent effect on the facility`s air emissions? Accurately determining the answers to such questions will help a facility determine which emission reduction alternatives are the most efficient and cost-effective. The use of an environmental data management system can make the analysis of different source operating scenarios a painless and efficient task. Within one database, a facility can store all possible operating scenario information, as well as all regulated emissions limits. The system will then process and calculate the air emissions quickly and accurately. Using statistical analysis tools, graphing capabilities, and reports embedded in the system, the facility can easily compare the pros and cons of each operating scenario.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. EnviroMetrics Software, Inc., New Castle, DE (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
353509
Report Number(s):
CONF-970677-
TRN: IM9929%%55
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 90. annual meeting and exhibition of the Air and Waste Management Association, Toronto (Canada), 8-13 Jun 1997; Other Information: PBD: 1997; Related Information: Is Part Of 1997 proceedings of the Air and Waste Management Association`s 90. annual meeting and exhibition; PB: [7000] p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; INDUSTRIAL WASTES; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; AIR POLLUTION ABATEMENT; CHEMICAL EFFLUENTS; DATA BASE MANAGEMENT; CHEMICAL INDUSTRY; EMISSION

Citation Formats

Rosen, N. Comparison of air emissions from various operating scenarios using an environmental database management system. United States: N. p., 1997. Web.
Rosen, N. Comparison of air emissions from various operating scenarios using an environmental database management system. United States.
Rosen, N. Wed . "Comparison of air emissions from various operating scenarios using an environmental database management system". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_353509,
title = {Comparison of air emissions from various operating scenarios using an environmental database management system},
author = {Rosen, N.},
abstractNote = {In their continuing effort to reduce air emissions, chemical and petroleum processing facilities must be able to predict, analyze, and compare emissions which result from a variety of operating scenarios. Will the use of a more expensive, yet cleaner fuel improve air emissions enough to warrant the extra cost? What are the threshold levels of production that will push a facility`s air emissions out of compliance with regulated limits? Which raw materials have the most prominent effect on the facility`s air emissions? Accurately determining the answers to such questions will help a facility determine which emission reduction alternatives are the most efficient and cost-effective. The use of an environmental data management system can make the analysis of different source operating scenarios a painless and efficient task. Within one database, a facility can store all possible operating scenario information, as well as all regulated emissions limits. The system will then process and calculate the air emissions quickly and accurately. Using statistical analysis tools, graphing capabilities, and reports embedded in the system, the facility can easily compare the pros and cons of each operating scenario.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1997},
month = {Wed Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1997}
}

Conference:
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