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Title: Parabolic Trough Solar Power for Competitive U.S. Markets

Abstract

Nine parabolic trough power plants located in the California Mojave Desert represent the only commercial development of large-scale solar power plants to date. Although all nine plants continue to operate today, no new solar power plants have been completed since 1990. Over the last several years, the parabolic trough industry has focused much of its efforts on international market opportunities. Although the power market in developing countries appears to offer a number of opportunities for parabolic trough technologies due to high growth and the availability of special financial incentives for renewables, these markets are also plagued with many difficulties for developers. In recent years, there has been some renewed interest in the U.S. domestic power market as a result of an emerging green market and green pricing incentives. Unfortunately, many of these market opportunities and incentives focus on smaller, more modular technologies (such as photovoltaics or wind power), and as a result they tend to exclude or are of minimum long-term benefit to large-scale concentrating solar power technologies. This paper looks at what is necessary for large-scale parabolic trough solar power plants to compete with state-of-the-art fossil power technology in a competitive U.S. power market.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
3535
Report Number(s):
NREL/CP-550-25798
ON: DE00003535
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-83CH10093
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Prepared for the Proceedings of the ASME Renewable and Advanced Energy Systems for the 21st Century Conference, April 11-14, 1999, Maui, Hawaii
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; Solar Thermal Power Plants; Parabolic Trough Collectors; Market; Financial Incentives

Citation Formats

Henry W. Price. Parabolic Trough Solar Power for Competitive U.S. Markets. United States: N. p., 1998. Web.
Henry W. Price. Parabolic Trough Solar Power for Competitive U.S. Markets. United States.
Henry W. Price. Sun . "Parabolic Trough Solar Power for Competitive U.S. Markets". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/3535.
@article{osti_3535,
title = {Parabolic Trough Solar Power for Competitive U.S. Markets},
author = {Henry W. Price},
abstractNote = {Nine parabolic trough power plants located in the California Mojave Desert represent the only commercial development of large-scale solar power plants to date. Although all nine plants continue to operate today, no new solar power plants have been completed since 1990. Over the last several years, the parabolic trough industry has focused much of its efforts on international market opportunities. Although the power market in developing countries appears to offer a number of opportunities for parabolic trough technologies due to high growth and the availability of special financial incentives for renewables, these markets are also plagued with many difficulties for developers. In recent years, there has been some renewed interest in the U.S. domestic power market as a result of an emerging green market and green pricing incentives. Unfortunately, many of these market opportunities and incentives focus on smaller, more modular technologies (such as photovoltaics or wind power), and as a result they tend to exclude or are of minimum long-term benefit to large-scale concentrating solar power technologies. This paper looks at what is necessary for large-scale parabolic trough solar power plants to compete with state-of-the-art fossil power technology in a competitive U.S. power market.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 1998},
month = {Sun Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 1998}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • Nine parabolic trough power plants located in the California Mojave Desert represent the only commercial development of large-scale solar power plants to date. Although all nine plants continue to operate today, no new solar power plants have been completed since 190. Over the last several years, the parabolic trough industry has focused much of its efforts on international market opportunities. Although the power market in developing countries appears to offer a number of opportunities for parabolic trough technologies due to high growth and the availability of special financial incentives for renewables, these markets are also plagued with many difficulties formore » developers. In recent years, there has been some renewed interest in the U.S. domestic power market as a results of an emerging green market and green pricing incentives. Unfortunately, many of these market opportunities and incentives focus on smaller, more modular technologies (such as photovoltaics or wind power), and as a result they tend to exclude or are of minimum long-term benefit to large-scale concentrating solar power technologies. This paper looks at what is necessary for large-scale parabolic trough solar power plants to compete with state-of-the-art fossil power technology in a competitive US power market.« less
  • This presentation includes discusses the restructuring of the California power market and the resulting impacts.
  • The Corporate Headquarters Office Building of Georgia Power Company (GPC) has one of the largest commercial applications of solar energy for building heating, cooling, and domestic hot water in the U.S. A performance type specification was issued with a guaranteed performance in Btu/yr. A one year operation, maintenance, and monitoring effort is now underway. Conclusions reached during this project includes: even with performance type specifications, detailed specifications for integration into building mechanical systems are required, reaction time of the computer control system can inhibit the collector tracking system performance, extreme care must be used in a large system design tomore » insure balanced flow, the Delavan tracker can be altered to operate more efficiently, and the GPC solar system is providing slightly less than the predicted amount of energy, due to apparently higher than expected parasltic losses.« less
  • This paper describes the results of a validation of the FLAGSOL parabolic trough solar power plant performance model. The validation was accomplished by simulating an operating solar electric generating system (SEGS) parabolic trough solar thermal power plant and comparing the model output results with actual plant operating data. This comparison includes instantaneous, daily, and annual total solar thermal electric output, gross solar electric generation, and solar mode parasitic electric consumption. The results indicate that the FLAGSOL model adequately predicts the gross solar electric output of an operating plant, both on a daily and an annual basis.
  • Direct steam generation (DSG) in parabolic troughs was first studied in the early eighties by Murphy (1982) and Pederson (1982). Intensive research on DSG then started in 1988, when Luz identified this technology as the desired system for a future generation of its power plants. These R and D activities were not terminated on Luz`s demise in 1991, but have been continued by several institutes and companies in Europe as well as in Israel (Dagan et al., 1991, Mueller et al., 1992a,b, 1993, 1994). This paper concerns the dynamic reaction of the water-steam flow. In order to investigate this, amore » numerical simulation program was developed at the ZSW. The numerical approach, its verification, and results of an extended study concerning the reaction and the control(ability) of a once-through DSG system at different weather conditions are presented.« less