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Title: Transient power supply voltage (v{sub DDT}) analysis for detecting IC defects

Abstract

Transient power supply voltage (V{sub DDT}) analysis is a new testing technique demonstrated as a powerful alternative and complement to I{sub DDQ} testing. V{sub DDT} takes advantage of the limited response time of a voltage supply to the changing power demands of an IC during operation. Changes in the V{sub DD} response time are used to detect increases in power demand with resolutions of 100 nA at 100 kHz, 1 {mu}A at 1 MHz, and 2.5 {mu}A at 1.5 MHz. These current sensitivities have been shown for ICs with quiescent currents < 0.1 {mu}A and > 300 {mu}A. The V{sub DDT} signal acquisition protocols, frequency versus sensitivity tradeoffs, hardware considerations and limitations, data examples, and areas for future research are described.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. and others
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
351426
Report Number(s):
SAND-97-0797C; CONF-971122-1
ON: DE97005158; TRN: 97:003828
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: IEEE Computer Society international test conference, Washington, DC (United States), 3-5 Nov 1997; Other Information: PBD: 1997
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING NOT INCLUDED IN OTHER CATEGORIES; INTEGRATED CIRCUITS; ELECTRICAL TESTING; POWER SUPPLIES; FAILURE MODE ANALYSIS; VOLTAGE DROP

Citation Formats

Cole, E.I. Jr., Soden, J.M., and Beegle, R.W. Transient power supply voltage (v{sub DDT}) analysis for detecting IC defects. United States: N. p., 1997. Web.
Cole, E.I. Jr., Soden, J.M., & Beegle, R.W. Transient power supply voltage (v{sub DDT}) analysis for detecting IC defects. United States.
Cole, E.I. Jr., Soden, J.M., and Beegle, R.W. Tue . "Transient power supply voltage (v{sub DDT}) analysis for detecting IC defects". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_351426,
title = {Transient power supply voltage (v{sub DDT}) analysis for detecting IC defects},
author = {Cole, E.I. Jr. and Soden, J.M. and Beegle, R.W.},
abstractNote = {Transient power supply voltage (V{sub DDT}) analysis is a new testing technique demonstrated as a powerful alternative and complement to I{sub DDQ} testing. V{sub DDT} takes advantage of the limited response time of a voltage supply to the changing power demands of an IC during operation. Changes in the V{sub DD} response time are used to detect increases in power demand with resolutions of 100 nA at 100 kHz, 1 {mu}A at 1 MHz, and 2.5 {mu}A at 1.5 MHz. These current sensitivities have been shown for ICs with quiescent currents < 0.1 {mu}A and > 300 {mu}A. The V{sub DDT} signal acquisition protocols, frequency versus sensitivity tradeoffs, hardware considerations and limitations, data examples, and areas for future research are described.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Apr 01 00:00:00 EST 1997},
month = {Tue Apr 01 00:00:00 EST 1997}
}

Conference:
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