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Title: Characterization of emissions from scrap metal processing facilities

Abstract

To prepare its members for the permitting requirements under Title 5 of the Clean Act, the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI) commissioned a project to develop a Title 5 applicability workbook. A critical element in the preparation of the workbook was the characterization of emissions from processes and equipment typically found in the scrap metal processing industry. This paper describes the approach to the preparation of the workbook with emphasis on characterization of specific emission units which are deemed important for Title 5. The paper describes the methodology employed for acquiring existing emissions information from equipment manufacturers, vendors, and scrap recycling facility operators. The data were aggregated and analyzed to develop a variety of emission tabulations for pollutants requiring analysis under Title 5. The project also involved a survey of numerous state and local air pollution agencies to determine regulatory requirements regarding critical issues in the scrap processing industry. The paper describes a methodology for determining Title 5 applicability with emphasis on the use of emission tabulations and example worksheets. Emissions data are presented for metal shredders to demonstrate the methodology and procedures developed during the project. Finally, the paper discusses the structure of the Title 5 applicability workbookmore » and its dissemination to a major industry trade association.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Versar, Inc., Lombard, IL (United States)
  2. Inst. of Scrap Recycling Industries, Inc., Washington, DC (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
351127
Report Number(s):
CONF-970677-
TRN: IM9925%%289
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 90. annual meeting and exhibition of the Air and Waste Management Association, Toronto (Canada), 8-13 Jun 1997; Other Information: PBD: 1997; Related Information: Is Part Of 1997 proceedings of the Air and Waste Management Association`s 90. annual meeting and exhibition; PB: [7000] p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; INDUSTRIAL WASTES; SCRAP METALS; CHEMICAL COMPOSITION; AIR POLLUTION; EMISSION; MANUALS; AIR POLLUTION ABATEMENT; CLEAN AIR ACTS; COMPLIANCE; WASTE MANAGEMENT

Citation Formats

Norco, J.E., and Tyler, T.. Characterization of emissions from scrap metal processing facilities. United States: N. p., 1997. Web.
Norco, J.E., & Tyler, T.. Characterization of emissions from scrap metal processing facilities. United States.
Norco, J.E., and Tyler, T.. Wed . "Characterization of emissions from scrap metal processing facilities". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_351127,
title = {Characterization of emissions from scrap metal processing facilities},
author = {Norco, J.E. and Tyler, T.},
abstractNote = {To prepare its members for the permitting requirements under Title 5 of the Clean Act, the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI) commissioned a project to develop a Title 5 applicability workbook. A critical element in the preparation of the workbook was the characterization of emissions from processes and equipment typically found in the scrap metal processing industry. This paper describes the approach to the preparation of the workbook with emphasis on characterization of specific emission units which are deemed important for Title 5. The paper describes the methodology employed for acquiring existing emissions information from equipment manufacturers, vendors, and scrap recycling facility operators. The data were aggregated and analyzed to develop a variety of emission tabulations for pollutants requiring analysis under Title 5. The project also involved a survey of numerous state and local air pollution agencies to determine regulatory requirements regarding critical issues in the scrap processing industry. The paper describes a methodology for determining Title 5 applicability with emphasis on the use of emission tabulations and example worksheets. Emissions data are presented for metal shredders to demonstrate the methodology and procedures developed during the project. Finally, the paper discusses the structure of the Title 5 applicability workbook and its dissemination to a major industry trade association.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1997},
month = {Wed Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1997}
}

Conference:
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  • Large quantities of scrap metal are generated during the extensive worldwide decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities and, to a lesser extent, during the normal operations of these facilities. To evaluate the radiological impacts of releasing potentially contaminated metals to the general environment, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) performed an exhaustive analysis of the release and recycling of carbon steel scrap. Further assessments were performed of the clearance and recycling of aluminum and copper scrap. The aim of the analyses was to calculate the annual dose and the lifetime risk of cancer to the reasonably maximally exposed (RME) individual,more » normalized to the specific activity of a given radioactive contaminant in the scrap, from 1 yr of exposure. These results, presented as a set of tables that list the normalized doses and risks to the RME individual for each of 40 radionuclides that are potential contaminants of the three metals, can be used to assess the potential health effects of releasing scrap with a given level of contamination. This report describes the analysis and gives a summary of the results.« less
  • On July 21, 1992, the EPA promulgated a new Part 70 of Chapter I of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) that contained state operating permit provisions as required by Title V of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Shortly thereafter, most states and many individual companies began developing long-term strategies for preparing and reviewing operating permit applications and issuing new operating permits. Many companies that had previously not been required to obtain air permits found themselves having to prepare permit applications using emission inventory information which was outdated, outmoded, and often inaccurate. More detailed informationmore » was necessary to verify or determine whether the facility was a major source and, more importantly whether the site was in compliance with existing regulations. This was the case with the natural gas processing industry. In some instances test data which had been obtained for an earlier regulatory requirement (expansion, EIQ, NO{sub x} RACT) was employed. In other cases, emission factors supplied by the manufacturer were used. In many cases, the facility had been built many years before and was presently {open_quotes}grandfathered.{close_quotes} In all cases, this industry includes a number of emission sources not encountered elsewhere. This paper is organized into four sections: (1) characteristics of the natural gas processing industry; (2) regulations applicable to the industry; (3) typical emissions and available procedures for estimating emissions; and (4) {open_quotes}nontypical{close_quotes} emissions and new areas where better information is needed.« less
  • Members of The Vinyl Inst., under the auspices of its Dioxin Characterization Program have analyzed for potential dioxin/furan (PCDD/F) concentrations in polyvinylchloride (PVC) resins, treated wastewater effluent, ethylene dichloride (EDC) product and wastewater sludge at EDC, vinyl chloride (VCM) and PVC facilities. No 2,3,7,8-TCDD was detected in any sample analyzed under the program to date. Results from wastewater sludge analysis are pending. Trace concentrations (low pg/g) of PCDD/F were detected in only a few samples of PVC resins and ethylene dichloride (EDC) product. Treated wastewater contained low ppq concentrations of PCDD/F. All concentrations are expressed as Toxicity Equivalents (TEQ). Extrapolationmore » of these data shows that the contribution of EDC/VCM/PVC manufacturing via these media constitutes less than 1 percent of the US annual dioxin emission to the environment.« less
  • The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently developing radiation protection standards for scrap metal, which will establish criteria for the unconditional clearance of scrap from nuclear facilities. In support of this effort, Industrial Economics, Incorporated is assessing the costs and benefits attributable to the rulemaking. The first step in this analysis is to develop an in-depth understanding of the factors influencing scrap disposition decisions, so that one can predict current and future practices under existing requirements and compare them to the potential effects of EPA`s rulemaking. These baseline practices are difficult to predict due to a variety of factors.more » First, because decommissioning activities are just beginning at many sites, current practices do not necessarily provide an accurate indicator of how these practices may evolve as site managers gain experience with related decisions. Second, a number of different regulations and policies apply to these decisions, and the interactive effects of these requirements can be difficult to predict. Third, factors other than regulatory constraints and costs may have a significant effect on related decisions, such as concerns about public perceptions. In general, research suggests that these factors tend to discourage the unconditional clearance of scrap metal.« less
  • The conference proceedings contains 25 papers, four of which are represented by abstracts. Twenty one papers are indexed separately. The papers are arranged in four sessions: Mining and mineral processing waste; Urban solid wastes; Industrial waste recovery; and Scrap metal recovery.