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Title: Tensile stress generation by optical breakdown in tissue: Experimental investigations and numerical simulations

Abstract

Biological tissue is more susceptible to damage from tensile stress than to compressive stress. Tensile stress may arise through the thermoelastic response of laser-irradiated media. Optical breakdown, however, has to date been exclusively associated with compressive stress. The authors show that this is appropriate for water, but not for tissues for which the elastic-plastic material response needs to be considered. The acoustic transients following optical breakdown in water and cornea were measured with a fast hydrophone and the cavitation bubble dynamics, which is closely linked to the stress wave generation, was documented by flash photography. Breakdown in water produced a monopolar acoustic signal and a bubble oscillation in which the expansion and collapse phases were symmetric. Breakdown in cornea produced a bipolar acoustic signal coupled with a pronounced shortening of the bubble expansion phase and a considerable prolongation of its collapse phase. The tensile stress wave is related to the abrupt end of the bubble expansion. Numerical simulations using the MESA-2D code were performed assuming elastic-plastic material behavior in a wide range of values for the shear modulus and yield strength. The calculations revealed that consideration of the elastic-plastic material response is essential to reproduce the experimentally observed bipolar stressmore » waves. The tensile stress evolves during the outward propagation of the acoustic transient and reaches an amplitude of 30--40% of the compressive pulse.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ;  [2]
  1. Medizinisches Laserzentrum Luebeck (Germany)
  2. Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
350970
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-99-175; CONF-990110-
ON: DE99002013; TRN: AHC29921%%156
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Conference: Photonics West `99: international symposium on biomedical optics (BIOS`99), San Jose, CA (United States), 23-29 Jan 1999; Other Information: PBD: [1999]
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; ANIMAL TISSUES; LASER RADIATION; STRESSES; TENSILE PROPERTIES; CORNEA; BUBBLES; DAMAGE; MEDICINE; THERAPEUTIC USES; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; THEORETICAL DATA

Citation Formats

Vogel, A, Scammon, R J, and Godwin, R P. Tensile stress generation by optical breakdown in tissue: Experimental investigations and numerical simulations. United States: N. p., 1999. Web. doi:10.2172/350970.
Vogel, A, Scammon, R J, & Godwin, R P. Tensile stress generation by optical breakdown in tissue: Experimental investigations and numerical simulations. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/350970
Vogel, A, Scammon, R J, and Godwin, R P. 1999. "Tensile stress generation by optical breakdown in tissue: Experimental investigations and numerical simulations". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/350970. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/350970.
@article{osti_350970,
title = {Tensile stress generation by optical breakdown in tissue: Experimental investigations and numerical simulations},
author = {Vogel, A and Scammon, R J and Godwin, R P},
abstractNote = {Biological tissue is more susceptible to damage from tensile stress than to compressive stress. Tensile stress may arise through the thermoelastic response of laser-irradiated media. Optical breakdown, however, has to date been exclusively associated with compressive stress. The authors show that this is appropriate for water, but not for tissues for which the elastic-plastic material response needs to be considered. The acoustic transients following optical breakdown in water and cornea were measured with a fast hydrophone and the cavitation bubble dynamics, which is closely linked to the stress wave generation, was documented by flash photography. Breakdown in water produced a monopolar acoustic signal and a bubble oscillation in which the expansion and collapse phases were symmetric. Breakdown in cornea produced a bipolar acoustic signal coupled with a pronounced shortening of the bubble expansion phase and a considerable prolongation of its collapse phase. The tensile stress wave is related to the abrupt end of the bubble expansion. Numerical simulations using the MESA-2D code were performed assuming elastic-plastic material behavior in a wide range of values for the shear modulus and yield strength. The calculations revealed that consideration of the elastic-plastic material response is essential to reproduce the experimentally observed bipolar stress waves. The tensile stress evolves during the outward propagation of the acoustic transient and reaches an amplitude of 30--40% of the compressive pulse.},
doi = {10.2172/350970},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/350970}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {3}
}