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Title: Hydrogeology and geochemistry of acid mine drainage in ground water in the vicinity of Penn Mine and Camanche Reservoir, Calaveras County, California. Summary report, 1993--1995

Abstract

The report presents results from the ground-water investigation at the Penn Mine by the US Geological Survey from October 1991 to April 1995. The specific objectives of the investigation were to evaluate (1) the quantity and quality of ground water flowing toward Camanche Reservoir from the Penn Mine area; (2) the ground-water transport of metals, sulfate, and acidity between Mine Run and Camanche Reservoirs; and (3) the hydrologic interactions between the flooded mine workings and other ground water and surface water in the vicinity.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Geological Survey, Water Resources Div., Sacramento, CA (United States); California State Water Resources Control Board, Sacramento, CA (United States); East Bay Municipal Utility District, Oakland, CA (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
350679
Report Number(s):
PB-99-139461/XAB; USGS/WRI-96-4287
TRN: 91311570
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CALIFORNIA; ACID MINE DRAINAGE; GROUND WATER; WATER QUALITY; ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT; METALS; SULFATES; PH VALUE; HYDROLOGY

Citation Formats

Alpers, C.N., Hamlin, S.N., and Hunerlach, M.P. Hydrogeology and geochemistry of acid mine drainage in ground water in the vicinity of Penn Mine and Camanche Reservoir, Calaveras County, California. Summary report, 1993--1995. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Alpers, C.N., Hamlin, S.N., & Hunerlach, M.P. Hydrogeology and geochemistry of acid mine drainage in ground water in the vicinity of Penn Mine and Camanche Reservoir, Calaveras County, California. Summary report, 1993--1995. United States.
Alpers, C.N., Hamlin, S.N., and Hunerlach, M.P. 1999. "Hydrogeology and geochemistry of acid mine drainage in ground water in the vicinity of Penn Mine and Camanche Reservoir, Calaveras County, California. Summary report, 1993--1995". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_350679,
title = {Hydrogeology and geochemistry of acid mine drainage in ground water in the vicinity of Penn Mine and Camanche Reservoir, Calaveras County, California. Summary report, 1993--1995},
author = {Alpers, C.N. and Hamlin, S.N. and Hunerlach, M.P.},
abstractNote = {The report presents results from the ground-water investigation at the Penn Mine by the US Geological Survey from October 1991 to April 1995. The specific objectives of the investigation were to evaluate (1) the quantity and quality of ground water flowing toward Camanche Reservoir from the Penn Mine area; (2) the ground-water transport of metals, sulfate, and acidity between Mine Run and Camanche Reservoirs; and (3) the hydrologic interactions between the flooded mine workings and other ground water and surface water in the vicinity.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1999,
month = 6
}

Technical Report:
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