skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Evaluating building IAQ and ventilation with indoor carbon dioxide

Abstract

A number of approaches exist to evaluate building ventilation and indoor air quality. In some situations, the measurement and analysis of indoor carbon dioxide concentrations can be useful for understanding indoor air quality and ventilation. On the other hand, oversimplified descriptions of measurement procedures based on carbon dioxide have been presented, and there have been many instances in which indoor carbon dioxide concentration measurements have been misinterpreted and misunderstood. This paper describes various applications of carbon dioxide concentrations for evaluating building air quality and ventilation and the factors that need to be considered in their use. While carbon dioxide concentrations do not provide a comprehensive indication of indoor air quality, they can be used to indicate the acceptability of a space in terms of human body odor. Also, under some circumstances carbon dioxide can also be used to estimate building air change rates and percent outdoor air intake at an air handler. These uses of indoor carbon dioxide concentrations, and the situations in which their use is appropriate, are described. In addition, the factors that must be considered when using indoor carbon dioxide concentrations in these ways are also discussed. These factors include building and ventilation system configuration, occupancy patterns,more » nonoccupant carbon dioxide sources, time and location of air sampling, and instrumentation for concentration measurement.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Building and Fire Research Lab.
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
349956
Report Number(s):
CONF-970668-
Journal ID: ISSN 0001-2505; TRN: IM9925%%107
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) annual meeting, Boston, MA (United States), 28 Jun - 2 Jul 1997; Other Information: PBD: 1997; Related Information: Is Part Of ASHRAE transactions: Technical and symposium papers, 1997. Volume 103, Part 2; PB: 1072 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; INDOOR AIR POLLUTION; AIR QUALITY; VENTILATION; CARBON DIOXIDE

Citation Formats

Persily, A.K. Evaluating building IAQ and ventilation with indoor carbon dioxide. United States: N. p., 1997. Web.
Persily, A.K. Evaluating building IAQ and ventilation with indoor carbon dioxide. United States.
Persily, A.K. Wed . "Evaluating building IAQ and ventilation with indoor carbon dioxide". United States.
@article{osti_349956,
title = {Evaluating building IAQ and ventilation with indoor carbon dioxide},
author = {Persily, A.K.},
abstractNote = {A number of approaches exist to evaluate building ventilation and indoor air quality. In some situations, the measurement and analysis of indoor carbon dioxide concentrations can be useful for understanding indoor air quality and ventilation. On the other hand, oversimplified descriptions of measurement procedures based on carbon dioxide have been presented, and there have been many instances in which indoor carbon dioxide concentration measurements have been misinterpreted and misunderstood. This paper describes various applications of carbon dioxide concentrations for evaluating building air quality and ventilation and the factors that need to be considered in their use. While carbon dioxide concentrations do not provide a comprehensive indication of indoor air quality, they can be used to indicate the acceptability of a space in terms of human body odor. Also, under some circumstances carbon dioxide can also be used to estimate building air change rates and percent outdoor air intake at an air handler. These uses of indoor carbon dioxide concentrations, and the situations in which their use is appropriate, are described. In addition, the factors that must be considered when using indoor carbon dioxide concentrations in these ways are also discussed. These factors include building and ventilation system configuration, occupancy patterns, nonoccupant carbon dioxide sources, time and location of air sampling, and instrumentation for concentration measurement.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
issn = {0001-2505},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1997},
month = {12}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share: