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Title: Numerical study of thermostat setpoint profiles for floor radiant heating and the effect of thermal mass

Abstract

This paper presents a numerical simulation study of a floor heating system with two different amounts of thermal mass, a medium amount (approximately 5 cm [1.9 in.] thick concrete) and a high amount (10 cm [3.9 in.] thick), under sunny and cloudy cold winter conditions. Three different thermostat setpoint profiles were considered with proportional control of the room operative temperature: constant setpoint, square wave, and half sinusoid. Analysis of the simulation results led to the following conclusions: Thermal mass in a floor heating system may be effectively employed both for storage of auxiliary supplied heat and as a means of ensuring a floor surface temperature within comfort limits (less than 29 C [84.2 F]), as well as for storage of direct passive solar gains incident on it. To achieve efficient storage of passive solar gains in the thermal mass of a floor heating system while maintaining good thermal comfort, a lower setpoint is required at night, as is a smooth change to a higher setpoint during the daytime, such as the half-sinusoidal shape presented in this paper. Floor thermal mass that is thicker than necessary (5 cm [1.9 in.] of concrete) may contribute to large room temperature swings when highmore » solar gains are present.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Concordia Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
345293
Report Number(s):
CONF-9702141-
Journal ID: ISSN 0001-2505; TRN: IM9922%%226
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) winter meeting, Philadelphia, PA (United States), 24-28 Feb 1997; Other Information: PBD: 1997; Related Information: Is Part Of ASHRAE transactions: Technical and symposium papers, 1997. Volume 103, Part 1; PB: 1136 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; NUMERICAL ANALYSIS; FLOORS; RADIANT HEATERS; THERMAL MASS; SEASONS; TEMPERATURE CONTROL; CONTROL SYSTEMS; HEAT GAIN; THERMAL COMFORT; HEAT STORAGE; CALIBRATION

Citation Formats

Athienitis, A K, and Chen, T. Numerical study of thermostat setpoint profiles for floor radiant heating and the effect of thermal mass. United States: N. p., 1997. Web.
Athienitis, A K, & Chen, T. Numerical study of thermostat setpoint profiles for floor radiant heating and the effect of thermal mass. United States.
Athienitis, A K, and Chen, T. Wed . "Numerical study of thermostat setpoint profiles for floor radiant heating and the effect of thermal mass". United States.
@article{osti_345293,
title = {Numerical study of thermostat setpoint profiles for floor radiant heating and the effect of thermal mass},
author = {Athienitis, A K and Chen, T},
abstractNote = {This paper presents a numerical simulation study of a floor heating system with two different amounts of thermal mass, a medium amount (approximately 5 cm [1.9 in.] thick concrete) and a high amount (10 cm [3.9 in.] thick), under sunny and cloudy cold winter conditions. Three different thermostat setpoint profiles were considered with proportional control of the room operative temperature: constant setpoint, square wave, and half sinusoid. Analysis of the simulation results led to the following conclusions: Thermal mass in a floor heating system may be effectively employed both for storage of auxiliary supplied heat and as a means of ensuring a floor surface temperature within comfort limits (less than 29 C [84.2 F]), as well as for storage of direct passive solar gains incident on it. To achieve efficient storage of passive solar gains in the thermal mass of a floor heating system while maintaining good thermal comfort, a lower setpoint is required at night, as is a smooth change to a higher setpoint during the daytime, such as the half-sinusoidal shape presented in this paper. Floor thermal mass that is thicker than necessary (5 cm [1.9 in.] of concrete) may contribute to large room temperature swings when high solar gains are present.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
issn = {0001-2505},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1997},
month = {12}
}

Conference:
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