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Title: Performance assessment techniques for groundwater recovery and treatment systems

Abstract

Groundwater recovery and treatment (pump and treat systems) continue to be the most commonly selected remedial technology for groundwater restoration and protection programs at hazardous waste sites and RCRA facilities nationwide. Implementing a typical groundwater recovery and treatment system includes the initial assessment of groundwater quality, characterizing aquifer hydrodynamics, recovery system design, system installation, testing, permitting, and operation and maintenance. This paper focuses on methods used to assess the long-term efficiency of a pump and treat system. Regulatory agencies and industry alike are sensitive to the need for accurate assessment of the performance and success of groundwater recovery systems for contaminant plume abatement and aquifer restoration. Several assessment methods are available to measure the long-term performance of a groundwater recovery system. This paper presents six assessment techniques: degree of compliance with regulatory agency agreement (Consent Order of Record of Decision), hydraulic demonstration of system performance, contaminant mass recovery calculation, system design and performance comparison, statistical evaluation of groundwater quality and preferably, integration of the assessment methods. Applying specific recovery system assessment methods depends upon the type, amount, and quality of data available. Use of an integrated approach is encouraged to evaluate the success of a groundwater recovery and treatment system.more » The methods presented in this paper are for engineers and corporate management to use when discussing the effectiveness of groundwater remediation systems with their environmental consultant. In addition, an independent (third party) system evaluation is recommended to be sure that a recovery system operates efficiently and with minimum expense.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Environmental Resources Management, Inc., Exton, PA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). National Low-Level Waste Management Program
OSTI Identifier:
343721
Report Number(s):
CONF-921137-PROC.
ON: DE98050439; TRN: IM9921%%185
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 14. annual DOE low-level radioactive waste management conference, Phoenix, AZ (United States), 18-20 Nov 1992; Other Information: PBD: Mar 1993; Related Information: Is Part Of Fourteenth annual U.S. Department of Energy low-level radioactive waste management conference: Proceedings; PB: 651 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; GROUND WATER; REMEDIAL ACTION; AQUIFERS; WATER TREATMENT PLANTS; EFFICIENCY; PERFORMANCE

Citation Formats

Kirkpatrick, G.L. Performance assessment techniques for groundwater recovery and treatment systems. United States: N. p., 1993. Web.
Kirkpatrick, G.L. Performance assessment techniques for groundwater recovery and treatment systems. United States.
Kirkpatrick, G.L. 1993. "Performance assessment techniques for groundwater recovery and treatment systems". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/343721.
@article{osti_343721,
title = {Performance assessment techniques for groundwater recovery and treatment systems},
author = {Kirkpatrick, G.L.},
abstractNote = {Groundwater recovery and treatment (pump and treat systems) continue to be the most commonly selected remedial technology for groundwater restoration and protection programs at hazardous waste sites and RCRA facilities nationwide. Implementing a typical groundwater recovery and treatment system includes the initial assessment of groundwater quality, characterizing aquifer hydrodynamics, recovery system design, system installation, testing, permitting, and operation and maintenance. This paper focuses on methods used to assess the long-term efficiency of a pump and treat system. Regulatory agencies and industry alike are sensitive to the need for accurate assessment of the performance and success of groundwater recovery systems for contaminant plume abatement and aquifer restoration. Several assessment methods are available to measure the long-term performance of a groundwater recovery system. This paper presents six assessment techniques: degree of compliance with regulatory agency agreement (Consent Order of Record of Decision), hydraulic demonstration of system performance, contaminant mass recovery calculation, system design and performance comparison, statistical evaluation of groundwater quality and preferably, integration of the assessment methods. Applying specific recovery system assessment methods depends upon the type, amount, and quality of data available. Use of an integrated approach is encouraged to evaluate the success of a groundwater recovery and treatment system. The methods presented in this paper are for engineers and corporate management to use when discussing the effectiveness of groundwater remediation systems with their environmental consultant. In addition, an independent (third party) system evaluation is recommended to be sure that a recovery system operates efficiently and with minimum expense.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1993,
month = 3
}

Conference:
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