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Title: Environmental contaminants in the food chain, NWS Seal Beach and Seal Beach NWR

Abstract

The authors conducted a study to determine whether environmental contaminants occurred in fish and invertebrates at concentrations that could be harmful to birds feeding in the estuarine salt marsh at Seal Beach National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), which is part of Naval Weapons Station (NWS) Seal Beach. Management of the refuge is focused primarily on endangered species, especially the light-footed clapper rail and the California least tern. Important food-chain organisms taken by rails (e.g., crabs and snails) and least terns (small fish) were sampled and analyzed for inorganic and organic contaminants that might be related to Navy activities at the Station. Results indicated that those contaminants are not likely to have lethal effects on rails or terns, although some chemicals (including cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, zinc and DDE) occurred at elevated concentrations in portions of the marsh. Possible sublethal effects also were evaluated and will be discussed.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]; ;  [3]
  1. CH2M Hill, Sacramento, CA (United States)
  2. CH2M Hill, San Jose, CA (United States)
  3. Naval Facilities Engineering Command, San Diego, CA (United States). SW Division
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
33570
Report Number(s):
CONF-9410273-
TRN: IM9518%%390
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 15. annual meeting of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC), Denver, CO (United States), 30 Oct - 3 Nov 1994; Other Information: PBD: 1994; Related Information: Is Part Of Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 15th annual meeting: Abstract book. Ecological risk: Science, policy, law, and perception; PB: 286 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; NATURE RESERVES; WATER POLLUTION; ESTUARIES; FOOD CHAINS; CONTAMINATION; CADMIUM; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; CHROMIUM; COPPER; LEAD; ZINC; BIRDS; SENSITIVITY

Citation Formats

Ohlendorf, H.M., Byron, E.R., Freas, K.E., Casados, E.M., and Kidwell, J.J. Environmental contaminants in the food chain, NWS Seal Beach and Seal Beach NWR. United States: N. p., 1994. Web.
Ohlendorf, H.M., Byron, E.R., Freas, K.E., Casados, E.M., & Kidwell, J.J. Environmental contaminants in the food chain, NWS Seal Beach and Seal Beach NWR. United States.
Ohlendorf, H.M., Byron, E.R., Freas, K.E., Casados, E.M., and Kidwell, J.J. 1994. "Environmental contaminants in the food chain, NWS Seal Beach and Seal Beach NWR". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_33570,
title = {Environmental contaminants in the food chain, NWS Seal Beach and Seal Beach NWR},
author = {Ohlendorf, H.M. and Byron, E.R. and Freas, K.E. and Casados, E.M. and Kidwell, J.J.},
abstractNote = {The authors conducted a study to determine whether environmental contaminants occurred in fish and invertebrates at concentrations that could be harmful to birds feeding in the estuarine salt marsh at Seal Beach National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), which is part of Naval Weapons Station (NWS) Seal Beach. Management of the refuge is focused primarily on endangered species, especially the light-footed clapper rail and the California least tern. Important food-chain organisms taken by rails (e.g., crabs and snails) and least terns (small fish) were sampled and analyzed for inorganic and organic contaminants that might be related to Navy activities at the Station. Results indicated that those contaminants are not likely to have lethal effects on rails or terns, although some chemicals (including cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, zinc and DDE) occurred at elevated concentrations in portions of the marsh. Possible sublethal effects also were evaluated and will be discussed.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1994,
month =
}

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