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Title: Remote metrology system (RMS) design concept

Abstract

A 3D remote metrology system (RMS) is needed to map the interior plasma-facing components of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The performance and survival of these components within the reactor vessel are strongly dependent on their precise alignment and positioning with respect to the plasma edge. Without proper positioning and alignment, plasma-facing surfaces will erode rapidly. A RMS design involving Coleman Research Corporation (CRC) fiber optic coherent laser radar (CLR) technology is examined in this study. The fiber optic CLR approach was selected because its high precision should be able to meet the ITER 0.1 mm accuracy requirement and because the CLR`s fiber optic implementation allows a 3D scanner to operate remotely from the RMS system`s vulnerable components. This design study has largely verified that a fiber optic CLR based RMS can survive the ITER environment and map the ITER interior at the required accuracy at a one measurement/cm{sup 2} density with a total measurement time of less than one hour from each of six or more vertically deployed measurement probes. The design approach employs a sealed and pressurized measurement probe which is attached with an umbilical spiral bellows conduit. This conduit bears fiber optic and electronic links plusmore » a stream of air to lower the temperature in the interior of the probe. Lowering the probe temperature is desirable because probe electromechanical components which could survive the radiation environment often were not rated for the 200 C temperature. The tip of the probe whose outer shell has a flexible bellows joint can swivel in two degrees of freedom to allow mapping operations at each probe deployment level. This design study has concluded that the most successful scanner design will involve a hybrid AO beam deflector and mechanical scanner.« less

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Coleman Research Corp., Springfield, VA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
329538
Report Number(s):
DOE/EW/12823-T5
ON: DE96008604; TRN: 99:003608
DOE Contract Number:
AM01-96EW12823
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 19 Oct 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION; ITER TOKAMAK; ALIGNMENT; POSITIONING; OPTICAL FIBERS; OPTICAL RADAR; DESIGN; ACCURACY; MAPPING; REMOTE CONTROL

Citation Formats

NONE. Remote metrology system (RMS) design concept. United States: N. p., 1995. Web. doi:10.2172/329538.
NONE. Remote metrology system (RMS) design concept. United States. doi:10.2172/329538.
NONE. Thu . "Remote metrology system (RMS) design concept". United States. doi:10.2172/329538. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/329538.
@article{osti_329538,
title = {Remote metrology system (RMS) design concept},
author = {NONE},
abstractNote = {A 3D remote metrology system (RMS) is needed to map the interior plasma-facing components of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The performance and survival of these components within the reactor vessel are strongly dependent on their precise alignment and positioning with respect to the plasma edge. Without proper positioning and alignment, plasma-facing surfaces will erode rapidly. A RMS design involving Coleman Research Corporation (CRC) fiber optic coherent laser radar (CLR) technology is examined in this study. The fiber optic CLR approach was selected because its high precision should be able to meet the ITER 0.1 mm accuracy requirement and because the CLR`s fiber optic implementation allows a 3D scanner to operate remotely from the RMS system`s vulnerable components. This design study has largely verified that a fiber optic CLR based RMS can survive the ITER environment and map the ITER interior at the required accuracy at a one measurement/cm{sup 2} density with a total measurement time of less than one hour from each of six or more vertically deployed measurement probes. The design approach employs a sealed and pressurized measurement probe which is attached with an umbilical spiral bellows conduit. This conduit bears fiber optic and electronic links plus a stream of air to lower the temperature in the interior of the probe. Lowering the probe temperature is desirable because probe electromechanical components which could survive the radiation environment often were not rated for the 200 C temperature. The tip of the probe whose outer shell has a flexible bellows joint can swivel in two degrees of freedom to allow mapping operations at each probe deployment level. This design study has concluded that the most successful scanner design will involve a hybrid AO beam deflector and mechanical scanner.},
doi = {10.2172/329538},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Oct 19 00:00:00 EDT 1995},
month = {Thu Oct 19 00:00:00 EDT 1995}
}

Technical Report:

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