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Title: Ultrasonic characterization of microwave joined silicon carbide/silicon carbide

Abstract

High frequency (50--150 MHz), ultrasonic immersion testing has been used to characterize the surface and interfacial joint conditions of microwave bonded, monolithic silicon carbide (SiC) materials. The high resolution ultrasonic C-scan images point to damage accumulation after thermal cycling. Image processing was used to study the effects of the thermal cycling on waveform shape, amplitude and distribution. Such information is useful for concurrently engineering material fabrication processes and suitable nondestructive test procedures.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Knolls Atomic Power Lab., Schenectady, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
319834
Report Number(s):
KAPL-P-000157; K-97032; CONF-970568-
ON: DE99001879; TRN: 99:003946
DOE Contract Number:
AC12-76SN00052
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Conference: 99. annual meeting of the American Ceramic Society, Cincinnati, OH (United States), 4-7 May 1997; Other Information: PBD: May 1997
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 42 ENGINEERING NOT INCLUDED IN OTHER CATEGORIES; JOINING; ULTRASONIC TESTING; SILICON CARBIDES; ADHESIVES; MICROWAVE HEATING; IMAGE PROCESSING; THERMAL CYCLING; EXPERIMENTAL DATA

Citation Formats

House, M.B., and Day, P.S.. Ultrasonic characterization of microwave joined silicon carbide/silicon carbide. United States: N. p., 1997. Web. doi:10.2172/319834.
House, M.B., & Day, P.S.. Ultrasonic characterization of microwave joined silicon carbide/silicon carbide. United States. doi:10.2172/319834.
House, M.B., and Day, P.S.. Thu . "Ultrasonic characterization of microwave joined silicon carbide/silicon carbide". United States. doi:10.2172/319834. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/319834.
@article{osti_319834,
title = {Ultrasonic characterization of microwave joined silicon carbide/silicon carbide},
author = {House, M.B. and Day, P.S.},
abstractNote = {High frequency (50--150 MHz), ultrasonic immersion testing has been used to characterize the surface and interfacial joint conditions of microwave bonded, monolithic silicon carbide (SiC) materials. The high resolution ultrasonic C-scan images point to damage accumulation after thermal cycling. Image processing was used to study the effects of the thermal cycling on waveform shape, amplitude and distribution. Such information is useful for concurrently engineering material fabrication processes and suitable nondestructive test procedures.},
doi = {10.2172/319834},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu May 01 00:00:00 EDT 1997},
month = {Thu May 01 00:00:00 EDT 1997}
}

Technical Report:

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