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Title: Multiphase pumps and flow meters avoid platform construction

Abstract

One of the newest wrinkles in efficiency in BP`s Eastern Trough Area Project (ETAP) is the system for moving multiphase oil, water and gas fluids from the Machar satellite field to the Marnock Central Processing Facility (CPF). Using water-turbine-driven multiphase pumps and multiphase flow meters, the system moves fluid with no need for a production platform. In addition, BP has designed the installation so it reduces and controls water coning, thereby increasing recoverable reserves. Both subsea multiphase booster stations (SMUBS) and meters grew out of extensive development work and experience at Framo Engineering AS (Framo) in multiphase meters and multiphase pump systems for subsea installation. Multiphase meter development began in 1990 and the first subsea multiphase meters were installed in the East Spar Project in Australia in 1996. By September 1998, the meters had been operating successfully for more than 1 year. A single multiphase meter installed in Marathon`s West Brae Project has also successfully operated for more than 1 year. Subsea meters for ETAP were installed and began operating in July 1998.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
308183
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Petroleum Engineer International; Journal Volume: 72; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: PBD: Feb 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; 02 PETROLEUM; PUMPS; FLOWMETERS; MULTIPHASE FLOW; OFFSHORE SITES; DESIGN; PERFORMANCE; INSTALLATION; MAINTENANCE

Citation Formats

Elde, J. Multiphase pumps and flow meters avoid platform construction. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Elde, J. Multiphase pumps and flow meters avoid platform construction. United States.
Elde, J. 1999. "Multiphase pumps and flow meters avoid platform construction". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_308183,
title = {Multiphase pumps and flow meters avoid platform construction},
author = {Elde, J.},
abstractNote = {One of the newest wrinkles in efficiency in BP`s Eastern Trough Area Project (ETAP) is the system for moving multiphase oil, water and gas fluids from the Machar satellite field to the Marnock Central Processing Facility (CPF). Using water-turbine-driven multiphase pumps and multiphase flow meters, the system moves fluid with no need for a production platform. In addition, BP has designed the installation so it reduces and controls water coning, thereby increasing recoverable reserves. Both subsea multiphase booster stations (SMUBS) and meters grew out of extensive development work and experience at Framo Engineering AS (Framo) in multiphase meters and multiphase pump systems for subsea installation. Multiphase meter development began in 1990 and the first subsea multiphase meters were installed in the East Spar Project in Australia in 1996. By September 1998, the meters had been operating successfully for more than 1 year. A single multiphase meter installed in Marathon`s West Brae Project has also successfully operated for more than 1 year. Subsea meters for ETAP were installed and began operating in July 1998.},
doi = {},
journal = {Petroleum Engineer International},
number = 2,
volume = 72,
place = {United States},
year = 1999,
month = 2
}
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