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Title: Clustering at High Redshift: Precise Constraints from a Deep, Wide-Area Survey

Abstract

We present constraints on the evolution of large-scale structure from a catalog of 710,000 galaxies with {ital I}{sub AB} {le} 24 derived from a KPNO 4 m CCD imaging survey of a contiguous 4{degree} {times} 4{degree} region. The advantage of using large contiguous surveys for measuring clustering properties on even modest angular scales is substantial: the effects of cosmic scatter are strongly suppressed. We provide highly accurate measurements of the two-point angular correlation function, {omega}({theta}), as a function of magnitude on scales up to 1&arcdeg;5. The amplitude of {omega}({theta}) declines by a factor of {approximately}10 over the range 16 {le} {ital I} {le} 20 but only by a factor of 2{endash}3 over the range 20 {lt} {ital I} {le} 23. For a redshift dependence of the spatial correlation function, {xi}({ital r}), parameterized as {xi}({ital r}, {ital z}) = ({ital r}/{ital r}{sub 0}){sup {minus}{gamma}}(1 + {ital z}){sup {minus}(3+{epsilon})}, we find {ital r}{sub 0} = 5.2 {plus_minus} 0.4 {ital h}{sup {minus}1} Mpc, and {epsilon} {approx_gt} 0 for {ital I} {le} 20. This is in good agreement with the results from local redshift surveys. At {ital I} {gt} 20, our best-fit values shift toward lower {ital r}{sub 0} and more negative {epsilon}. Amore » strong covariance between {ital r}{sub 0} and {epsilon} prevents us from rejecting {epsilon} {gt} 0 even at faint magnitudes, but if {epsilon} {gt} 1, we strongly reject {ital r}{sub 0} {approx_lt} 4 {ital h}{sup {minus}1} Mpc (comoving). The above expression for {xi}({ital r}, {ital z}) and our data give a correlation length of {ital r}{sub 0}({ital z} = 0.5) {approx} 3.0 {plus_minus} 0.4 {ital h}{sup {minus}1} Mpc, about a factor of 2 larger than the correlation length at {ital z} = 0.5 derived from the Canada-France Redshift Survey (CFRS). The small volume sampled by the CFRS and other deep redshift probes, however, makes these spatial surveys strongly susceptible to cosmic scatter and will tend to bias their derived correlation lengths toward the low end. Our results are consistent with redshift distributions in which {approximately}30{percent}{endash}50{percent} of the galaxies at {ital I} = 23 lie at {ital z} {gt} 1. The best-fit power-law slope of the correlation function remains independent of {ital I} magnitude for {ital I} {le} 22. At fainter limits, there is a suggestive trend toward flatter slopes that occurs at fluxes consistent with similar trends seen by Neuschaffer & Windhorst and Campos and coworkers. The galaxy counts span 11 magnitudes and provide an accurate calibration of the galaxy surface density. We find evidence for mild galaxy evolution: about 1 mag of brightening or a doubling of the density by {ital I} = 23 relative to an {Omega}{sub 0} = 1 no-evolution model, about 0.5 mag of brightening or a factor of 1.5 increase in surface density relative to an open model. Our galaxy counts agree well with those from the Hubble Deep Field survey and, thus, argue against a significant inclusion of subgalactic components in the latter census for {ital I} {lt} 24. {copyright} {ital {copyright} 1998.} {ital The American Astronomical Society}« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)
  2. National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States)
  3. University of Durham, Department of Physics, South Road, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)
  4. Johns Hopkins University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
303877
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Astrophysical Journal
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 506; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: PBD: Oct 1998
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
66 PHYSICS; NONLUMINOUS MATTER; GALAXY CLUSTERS; RED SHIFT; STATISTICS; COSMOLOGY; SURVEYS

Citation Formats

Postman, M, Lauer, T R, Szapudi, I, and Oegerle, W. Clustering at High Redshift: Precise Constraints from a Deep, Wide-Area Survey. United States: N. p., 1998. Web. doi:10.1086/306245.
Postman, M, Lauer, T R, Szapudi, I, & Oegerle, W. Clustering at High Redshift: Precise Constraints from a Deep, Wide-Area Survey. United States. https://doi.org/10.1086/306245
Postman, M, Lauer, T R, Szapudi, I, and Oegerle, W. Thu . "Clustering at High Redshift: Precise Constraints from a Deep, Wide-Area Survey". United States. https://doi.org/10.1086/306245.
@article{osti_303877,
title = {Clustering at High Redshift: Precise Constraints from a Deep, Wide-Area Survey},
author = {Postman, M and Lauer, T R and Szapudi, I and Oegerle, W},
abstractNote = {We present constraints on the evolution of large-scale structure from a catalog of 710,000 galaxies with {ital I}{sub AB} {le} 24 derived from a KPNO 4 m CCD imaging survey of a contiguous 4{degree} {times} 4{degree} region. The advantage of using large contiguous surveys for measuring clustering properties on even modest angular scales is substantial: the effects of cosmic scatter are strongly suppressed. We provide highly accurate measurements of the two-point angular correlation function, {omega}({theta}), as a function of magnitude on scales up to 1&arcdeg;5. The amplitude of {omega}({theta}) declines by a factor of {approximately}10 over the range 16 {le} {ital I} {le} 20 but only by a factor of 2{endash}3 over the range 20 {lt} {ital I} {le} 23. For a redshift dependence of the spatial correlation function, {xi}({ital r}), parameterized as {xi}({ital r}, {ital z}) = ({ital r}/{ital r}{sub 0}){sup {minus}{gamma}}(1 + {ital z}){sup {minus}(3+{epsilon})}, we find {ital r}{sub 0} = 5.2 {plus_minus} 0.4 {ital h}{sup {minus}1} Mpc, and {epsilon} {approx_gt} 0 for {ital I} {le} 20. This is in good agreement with the results from local redshift surveys. At {ital I} {gt} 20, our best-fit values shift toward lower {ital r}{sub 0} and more negative {epsilon}. A strong covariance between {ital r}{sub 0} and {epsilon} prevents us from rejecting {epsilon} {gt} 0 even at faint magnitudes, but if {epsilon} {gt} 1, we strongly reject {ital r}{sub 0} {approx_lt} 4 {ital h}{sup {minus}1} Mpc (comoving). The above expression for {xi}({ital r}, {ital z}) and our data give a correlation length of {ital r}{sub 0}({ital z} = 0.5) {approx} 3.0 {plus_minus} 0.4 {ital h}{sup {minus}1} Mpc, about a factor of 2 larger than the correlation length at {ital z} = 0.5 derived from the Canada-France Redshift Survey (CFRS). The small volume sampled by the CFRS and other deep redshift probes, however, makes these spatial surveys strongly susceptible to cosmic scatter and will tend to bias their derived correlation lengths toward the low end. Our results are consistent with redshift distributions in which {approximately}30{percent}{endash}50{percent} of the galaxies at {ital I} = 23 lie at {ital z} {gt} 1. The best-fit power-law slope of the correlation function remains independent of {ital I} magnitude for {ital I} {le} 22. At fainter limits, there is a suggestive trend toward flatter slopes that occurs at fluxes consistent with similar trends seen by Neuschaffer & Windhorst and Campos and coworkers. The galaxy counts span 11 magnitudes and provide an accurate calibration of the galaxy surface density. We find evidence for mild galaxy evolution: about 1 mag of brightening or a doubling of the density by {ital I} = 23 relative to an {Omega}{sub 0} = 1 no-evolution model, about 0.5 mag of brightening or a factor of 1.5 increase in surface density relative to an open model. Our galaxy counts agree well with those from the Hubble Deep Field survey and, thus, argue against a significant inclusion of subgalactic components in the latter census for {ital I} {lt} 24. {copyright} {ital {copyright} 1998.} {ital The American Astronomical Society}},
doi = {10.1086/306245},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/303877}, journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 1,
volume = 506,
place = {United States},
year = {1998},
month = {10}
}