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Title: Transgenic plants are sensitive bioindicators of nuclear pollution caused by the Chernobyl accident

Abstract

To evaluate the genetic consequences of radioactive contamination originating from the Nuclear reactor accident of Chernobyl on indigenous populations of plants and animals, it is essential to determine the rates of accumulating genetic changes in chronically irradiated populations. An increase in germline mutation rates in humans living close to the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant site, and a two- to tenfold increase in germline mutations in barn swallows breeding in Chernobyl have been reported. Little is known, however, about the effects of chronic irradiation on plant genomes. Ionizing radiation causes double-strand breaks in DNA, which are repaired via illegitimate or homologous recombination. The authors make use of Arabidopsis thaliana plants carrying a {beta}-glucuronidase marker gene as a recombination substrate to monitor genetic alterations in plant populations, which are caused by nuclear pollution of the environment around Chernobyl. A significant increase in somatic intrachromosomal recombination frequencies was observed at nuclear pollution levels from 0.1--900 Ci/km{sup 2}, consistent with an increase in chromosomal aberrations. This bioindicator may serve as a convenient and ethically acceptable alternative to animal systems.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Ivano-Frankivsk State Medical Academy (Ukraine)|[Friedrich Miescher Inst., Basel (Switzerland)
  2. Chernobyl Scientific and Technical Center of International Research (Ukraine)
  3. Friedrich Miescher Inst., Basel (Switzerland)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
298252
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Nature Biotechnology; Journal Volume: 16; Journal Issue: 11; Other Information: PBD: Nov 1998
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; 22 NUCLEAR REACTOR TECHNOLOGY; 21 NUCLEAR POWER REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; SOILS; BIOLOGICAL INDICATORS; CONTAMINATION; FALLOUT; REACTOR ACCIDENTS; CHERNOBYLSK-4 REACTOR; GENETIC RADIATION EFFECTS; HERBS; STRAND BREAKS; BIOLOGICAL MARKERS

Citation Formats

Kovalchuk, I., Kovalchuk, O., Arkhipov, A., and Hohn, B. Transgenic plants are sensitive bioindicators of nuclear pollution caused by the Chernobyl accident. United States: N. p., 1998. Web.
Kovalchuk, I., Kovalchuk, O., Arkhipov, A., & Hohn, B. Transgenic plants are sensitive bioindicators of nuclear pollution caused by the Chernobyl accident. United States.
Kovalchuk, I., Kovalchuk, O., Arkhipov, A., and Hohn, B. Sun . "Transgenic plants are sensitive bioindicators of nuclear pollution caused by the Chernobyl accident". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_298252,
title = {Transgenic plants are sensitive bioindicators of nuclear pollution caused by the Chernobyl accident},
author = {Kovalchuk, I. and Kovalchuk, O. and Arkhipov, A. and Hohn, B.},
abstractNote = {To evaluate the genetic consequences of radioactive contamination originating from the Nuclear reactor accident of Chernobyl on indigenous populations of plants and animals, it is essential to determine the rates of accumulating genetic changes in chronically irradiated populations. An increase in germline mutation rates in humans living close to the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant site, and a two- to tenfold increase in germline mutations in barn swallows breeding in Chernobyl have been reported. Little is known, however, about the effects of chronic irradiation on plant genomes. Ionizing radiation causes double-strand breaks in DNA, which are repaired via illegitimate or homologous recombination. The authors make use of Arabidopsis thaliana plants carrying a {beta}-glucuronidase marker gene as a recombination substrate to monitor genetic alterations in plant populations, which are caused by nuclear pollution of the environment around Chernobyl. A significant increase in somatic intrachromosomal recombination frequencies was observed at nuclear pollution levels from 0.1--900 Ci/km{sup 2}, consistent with an increase in chromosomal aberrations. This bioindicator may serve as a convenient and ethically acceptable alternative to animal systems.},
doi = {},
journal = {Nature Biotechnology},
number = 11,
volume = 16,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 1998},
month = {Sun Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 1998}
}
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  • In the course of a general program of radiological investigation of some sites for location of nuclear plants, various aquatic and riparian plants were tested with the view of using them as bioindicators of the contamination of the water and of its development with time. The study comprised first the comparison of various plant species and shows notably the difficulties of using helophytes as biological indicators; it results in the choice of aquatic mosses, in particular of Cinclidotus danubicus, as bioindicator. The response of this species at a given point, situated about 15 km downstream from the plant, is analyzedmore » for a period of more than three years. Finally, the levels of contamination of the indicator at various points along the course of the Meuse are compared at two-year intervals; the results are discussed in relation especially to the levels of activity of the wastes since 1969. (tr-auth)« less
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