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Title: Bulk amorphous materials

Abstract

This is the final report for a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this work was to develop the competency for the synthesis of novel bulk amorphous alloys. The authors researched their synthesis methods and alloy properties, including thermal stability, mechanical, and transport properties. The project also addressed the development of vanadium-spinel alloys for structural applications in hostile environments, the measurement of elastic constants and thermal expansion in single-crystal TiAl from 300 to 750 K, the measurement of elastic constants in gallium nitride, and a study of the shock-induced martensitic transformations in NiTi alloys.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. and others
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Assistant Secretary for Human Resources and Administration, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
296817
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-98-2368
ON: DE99001257; TRN: AHC29903%%215
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: [1998]
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; METALLIC GLASSES; HEAT RESISTANT MATERIALS; TITANIUM ALLOYS; ALUMINIUM ALLOYS; VANADIUM ALLOYS; NICKEL ALLOYS; GALLIUM NITRIDES; SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS; ALUMINIUM OXIDES; RESEARCH PROGRAMS

Citation Formats

Schwarz, R.B., Archuleta, J.I., and Sickafus, K.E.. Bulk amorphous materials. United States: N. p., 1998. Web. doi:10.2172/296817.
Schwarz, R.B., Archuleta, J.I., & Sickafus, K.E.. Bulk amorphous materials. United States. doi:10.2172/296817.
Schwarz, R.B., Archuleta, J.I., and Sickafus, K.E.. 1998. "Bulk amorphous materials". United States. doi:10.2172/296817. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/296817.
@article{osti_296817,
title = {Bulk amorphous materials},
author = {Schwarz, R.B. and Archuleta, J.I. and Sickafus, K.E.},
abstractNote = {This is the final report for a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this work was to develop the competency for the synthesis of novel bulk amorphous alloys. The authors researched their synthesis methods and alloy properties, including thermal stability, mechanical, and transport properties. The project also addressed the development of vanadium-spinel alloys for structural applications in hostile environments, the measurement of elastic constants and thermal expansion in single-crystal TiAl from 300 to 750 K, the measurement of elastic constants in gallium nitride, and a study of the shock-induced martensitic transformations in NiTi alloys.},
doi = {10.2172/296817},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1998,
month =
}

Technical Report:

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  • The objective of this project was to gain a basic understanding of the atomic and defect structure of BAAs and of how structural stability affects their deformation behavior. We placed particular emphasis on understanding (1) shear-band formation, which is the dominant deformation mode at ambient temperature; and (2) Newtonian plastic flow, which is expected to be the dominant deformation mode at supercooled-liquid temperatures in BAAs. Such understandings would allow suppression of shear instability, promotion of homogeneous deformation at low temperatures, and improved formability at supercooled-liquid temperatures.
  • The development of metallic glasses in bulk form has led to a resurgence of interest into the utilization of these materials for a variety of applications. A potentially exciting application for these bulk metallic glass (BMG) materials is their use as composite membranes to replace high cost Pd/Pd-alloy membranes for enhanced gas separation processes. One of the major drawbacks to the industrial use of Pd/Pd-alloy membranes is that during cycling above and below a critical temperature an irreversible change takes place in the palladium lattice structure which can result in significant damage to the membrane. Furthermore, the cost associated withmore » Pd-based membranes is a potential detractor for their continued use and BMG alloys offer a potentially attractive alternative. Several BMG alloys have been shown to possess high permeation rates, comparable to those measured for pure Pd metal. In addition, high strength and toughness when either in-situ or ex-situ second phase dispersoids are present. Both of these properties, high permeation and high strength/toughness, potentially make these materials attractive for gas separation membranes that could resist hydrogen 'embrittlement'. However, a fundamental understanding of the relationship between partially crystalline 'structure'/devitrification and permeation/embrittlement in these BMG materials is required in order to determine the operating window for separation membranes and provide additional input to the material synthesis community for improved alloy design. This project aims to fill the knowledge gap regarding the impact of crystallization on the permeation properties of metallic glass materials. The objectives of this study are to (i) determine the crystallization behavior in different gas environments of Fe and Zr based commercially available bulk metallic glass and (ii) quantify the effects of partial crystallinity on the hydrogen permeation properties of these metallic glass membranes.« less
  • No abstract prepared.
  • The report presents the results of laboratories participating in the twelveth, thirteenth, and third (III) blind round of the bulk sample analysis quality assurance program sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Three hundred twenty-three, 386, and 51 laboratories that analyze bulk samples (by polarized light microscopy) to determine asbestos content participated in these rounds, respectively. Laboratories received bulk samples of asbestos, asbestos substitutes, or other bulk-insulation materials. Three aspects of analytical results were considered: classification of a sample as either asbestos (positive) or nonasbestos (negative); identification of the specific type of asbestos present; and quantitation of the relative amountmore » of major constituents present. A performance rating was assessed for each laboratory, based only on the ability to correctly classify samples. Reductions of a possible 4/4 correct score was made only for the reporting of false positives and false negatives. Samples were correctly classified as asbestos or non-asbestos containing materials (as described in Federal Register, Vol. 47, No. 103, Thursday, May 27, 1982) by 98.5%, 98.6% and 96.7% of the laboratories participating in rounds twelve, thirteen and third blind round, respectively.« less