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Title: Improved methods for water shutoff. Final technical progress report, October 1, 1997--September 30, 1998

Abstract

In the United States, more than 20 billion barrels of salt water are produced each year during oilfield operations. A tremendous economic incentive exists to reduce water production if that can be accomplished without significantly sacrificing hydrocarbon production. This three-year research project had three objectives. The first objective was to identify chemical blocking agents that will (a) during placement, flow readily through fractures without penetrating significantly into porous rock and with screening out or developing excessive pressure gradients and (b) at a predictable and controllable time, become immobile and resistant breakdown upon exposure to moderate to high pressure gradients. The second objective was to identify schemes that optimize placement of the above blocking agents. The third objective was to explain why gels and other chemical blocking agents reduce permeability to one phase (e.g., water) more than that to another phase (e.g., oil or gas). The authors also wanted to identify conditions that maximize this phenomenon. This project consisted of three tasks, each of which addressed one of the above objectives. This report describes work performed during the third and final period of the project. During this three-year project, they: (1) Developed a procedure and software for sizing gelant treatments inmore » hydraulically fractured production wells; (2) Developed a method (based on interwell tracer results) to determine the potential for applying gel treatments in naturally fractured reservoirs; (3) Characterized gel properties during extrusion through fractures; (4) Developed a method to predict gel placement in naturally fractured reservoirs; (5) Made progress in elucidating the mechanism for why some gels can reduce permeability to water more than that to oil; (6) Demonstrated the limitations of using water/oil ratio diagnostic plots to distinguish between channeling and coning; and (7) Proposed a philosophy for diagnosing and attacking water-production problems.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, New Mexico Petroleum Recovery Research Center, Socorro, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
296688
Report Number(s):
DOE/PC/91008-14
ON: DE98000543; TRN: AHC29903%%86
DOE Contract Number:
AC22-94PC91008
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Oct 1998
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; PROGRESS REPORT; OIL WELLS; PLUGGING AGENTS; BRINES; PRODUCTION; PERMEABILITY; GELS; FRACTURED RESERVOIRS; FLUID MECHANICS; EXPERIMENTAL DATA

Citation Formats

Seright, R.S., Liang, J.T., Schrader, R., Hagstrom, J. II, Liu, J., and Wavrik, K. Improved methods for water shutoff. Final technical progress report, October 1, 1997--September 30, 1998. United States: N. p., 1998. Web. doi:10.2172/296688.
Seright, R.S., Liang, J.T., Schrader, R., Hagstrom, J. II, Liu, J., & Wavrik, K. Improved methods for water shutoff. Final technical progress report, October 1, 1997--September 30, 1998. United States. doi:10.2172/296688.
Seright, R.S., Liang, J.T., Schrader, R., Hagstrom, J. II, Liu, J., and Wavrik, K. 1998. "Improved methods for water shutoff. Final technical progress report, October 1, 1997--September 30, 1998". United States. doi:10.2172/296688. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/296688.
@article{osti_296688,
title = {Improved methods for water shutoff. Final technical progress report, October 1, 1997--September 30, 1998},
author = {Seright, R.S. and Liang, J.T. and Schrader, R. and Hagstrom, J. II and Liu, J. and Wavrik, K.},
abstractNote = {In the United States, more than 20 billion barrels of salt water are produced each year during oilfield operations. A tremendous economic incentive exists to reduce water production if that can be accomplished without significantly sacrificing hydrocarbon production. This three-year research project had three objectives. The first objective was to identify chemical blocking agents that will (a) during placement, flow readily through fractures without penetrating significantly into porous rock and with screening out or developing excessive pressure gradients and (b) at a predictable and controllable time, become immobile and resistant breakdown upon exposure to moderate to high pressure gradients. The second objective was to identify schemes that optimize placement of the above blocking agents. The third objective was to explain why gels and other chemical blocking agents reduce permeability to one phase (e.g., water) more than that to another phase (e.g., oil or gas). The authors also wanted to identify conditions that maximize this phenomenon. This project consisted of three tasks, each of which addressed one of the above objectives. This report describes work performed during the third and final period of the project. During this three-year project, they: (1) Developed a procedure and software for sizing gelant treatments in hydraulically fractured production wells; (2) Developed a method (based on interwell tracer results) to determine the potential for applying gel treatments in naturally fractured reservoirs; (3) Characterized gel properties during extrusion through fractures; (4) Developed a method to predict gel placement in naturally fractured reservoirs; (5) Made progress in elucidating the mechanism for why some gels can reduce permeability to water more than that to oil; (6) Demonstrated the limitations of using water/oil ratio diagnostic plots to distinguish between channeling and coning; and (7) Proposed a philosophy for diagnosing and attacking water-production problems.},
doi = {10.2172/296688},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1998,
month =
}

Technical Report:

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  • In the US, more than 20 billion barrels of water are produced each year during oilfield operations. There is a tremendous economic incentive to reduce water production if that can be accomplished without significantly sacrificing hydrocarbon production. In an earlier project, the authors determined that the ability of blocking agents to reduce permeability to water much more than that to oil is critical to the success of these blocking treatments in production wells if zones are not protected during placement of the blocking agent. This research project has three objectives: (1) to identify chemical blocking agents that will during placement,more » flow readily through fractures without penetrating significantly into porous rock and without screening out or developing excessive pressure gradients and at a predictable and controllable time, become immobile and resist breakdown upon exposure to moderate to high pressure gradients; (2) to identify schemes that optimize placement of blocking agents; and (3) to explain why gels and other chemical blocking agents reduce permeability to one phase (e.g., water) more than that of another phase (e.g., oil or gas). Chapter 2 examines the validity of using water/oil ratio plots to distinguish between coning and channeling water production mechanisms. Chapter 3 develops a method to size gelant treatments in hydraulically fractured production wells. Chapter 4 identifies characteristics of naturally fractured reservoirs where gel treatments have the greatest potential. Chapter 5 reports experimental results from studies of gel properties in fractures. Finally, Chapter 6, the authors investigate the mechanism responsible for gels reducing the permeability to water more than that to oil.« less
  • In the United States, more than 20 billion barrels of water are produced each year during oilfield operations. Today, the cost of water disposal is typically between $0.25 and $0.50 per bbl for pipeline transport and $1.50 per bbl for trucked water. Therefore, there is a tremendous economic incentive to reduce water production if that can be accomplished without significantly sacrificing hydrocarbon production. For each 1% reduction in water production, the cost-savings to the oil industry could be between $50,000,000 and $100,000,000 per year. Reduced water production would result directly in improved oil recovery (IOR) efficiency in addition to reducedmore » oil-production costs. A substantial positive environmental impact could also be realized if significant reductions are achieved in the amount of water produced during oilfield operations. In an earlier project, we identified fractures (either naturally or artificially induced) as a major factor that causes excess water production and reduced oil recovery efficiency, especially during waterfloods and IOR projects. We also found fractures to be a channeling and water-production problem that has a high potential for successful treatment by gels and certain other chemical blocking agents. By analogy, these blocking materials also have a high potential for treating narrow channels behind pipe and small casing leaks. We also determined that the ability of blocking agents to reduce permeability to water much more than that to oil is critical to the success of these blocking treatments in production wells if zones are not isolated during placement of the blocking agents.« less
  • The authors investigated the stability of aluminum at the high positive potentials encountered during the charging of lithium-ion cells. The electrolyte in these cells consists of solutions of lithium hexafluorophosphate and lithium methide in binary- and ternary-solvent mixtures of ethylene carbonate, dimethyl carbonate, and ethyl methyl carbonate. They performed the investigations with the controlled potential coulometry technique. They found that a protective surface film was formed on aluminum electrodes in these solutions and that this film protected the electrodes from further corrosion. The protective surface film was found to break down in lithium methide solutions at 4.25 V versus amore » lithium reference electrode, and this resulted in increased corrosion of the aluminum electrodes at higher potentials. In contrast to lithium methide solutions, the protective surface film formed on aluminum electrodes in lithium hexafluorophosphate solutions was found to be quite stable and did not break down at potentials up to [approximately]5 V.« less
  • When DOE funds were exhausted in March 1995, all Phase 2 activities were placed on hold. In February 1996 a detailed cost estimate was submitted to the DOE for completing the two remaining Phase 2 Multi Annular Swirl Burner (MASB) topping combustor test burns; in August 1996 release was received from METC to proceed with these tests. The first test (Test Campaign No.3) will be conducted to: (1) test the MASB at proposed demonstration plant full to minimum loading operating conditions; (2) identify the lower oxygen limit of the MASB; and (3) demonstrate natural gas to carbonizer fuel gas switching.more » The Livingston Phase 3 Pilot Plant was last operated under contract DE-AC21-86MC21023 in September 1995 for seven days in an integrated carbonizer-CPFBC configuration. In May, 1996, the pilot plant was transferred to Contract DE-AC22-95PC95143 to allow testing in support of the High Performance Power Systems (HIPPS) Program. The HIPPS Program required modifications to the pilot plant and the following changes were incorporated: (1) installation of a dense phase transport system for loading pulverized coal into the feed system lock hopper directly from a pneumatic transport truck; (2) removal of the char transfer pipe between the char collecting hopper and the CPFBC to allow carbonizer only operation; (3) installation of a lock hopper directly under the char collecting hopper to facilitate char removal from the process, the hopper vent gases exhaust to the carbonizer baghouse filter and the depressured char is transferred via nitrogen to the CPFBC baghouse for dumping into drums; (4) removal of the carbonizer cyclone and top of bed overflow drain line; all material elutriated from the carbonizer bed will thus be removed by the 22-element Westinghouse ceramic candle filter; (5) replacement of the carbonizer continuous bottom bed drain (screw feeder) with a batch-type drain removal system; and (6) installation of a mass spectrometer that draws sample gas via a steam jacketed line from the refractory lined piping downstream of the candle filter.« less