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Title: Improved methods for water shutoff. Final technical progress report, October 1, 1997--September 30, 1998

Abstract

In the United States, more than 20 billion barrels of salt water are produced each year during oilfield operations. A tremendous economic incentive exists to reduce water production if that can be accomplished without significantly sacrificing hydrocarbon production. This three-year research project had three objectives. The first objective was to identify chemical blocking agents that will (a) during placement, flow readily through fractures without penetrating significantly into porous rock and with screening out or developing excessive pressure gradients and (b) at a predictable and controllable time, become immobile and resistant breakdown upon exposure to moderate to high pressure gradients. The second objective was to identify schemes that optimize placement of the above blocking agents. The third objective was to explain why gels and other chemical blocking agents reduce permeability to one phase (e.g., water) more than that to another phase (e.g., oil or gas). The authors also wanted to identify conditions that maximize this phenomenon. This project consisted of three tasks, each of which addressed one of the above objectives. This report describes work performed during the third and final period of the project. During this three-year project, they: (1) Developed a procedure and software for sizing gelant treatments inmore » hydraulically fractured production wells; (2) Developed a method (based on interwell tracer results) to determine the potential for applying gel treatments in naturally fractured reservoirs; (3) Characterized gel properties during extrusion through fractures; (4) Developed a method to predict gel placement in naturally fractured reservoirs; (5) Made progress in elucidating the mechanism for why some gels can reduce permeability to water more than that to oil; (6) Demonstrated the limitations of using water/oil ratio diagnostic plots to distinguish between channeling and coning; and (7) Proposed a philosophy for diagnosing and attacking water-production problems.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, New Mexico Petroleum Recovery Research Center, Socorro, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
296688
Report Number(s):
DOE/PC/91008-14
ON: DE98000543; TRN: AHC29903%%86
DOE Contract Number:
AC22-94PC91008
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Oct 1998
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; PROGRESS REPORT; OIL WELLS; PLUGGING AGENTS; BRINES; PRODUCTION; PERMEABILITY; GELS; FRACTURED RESERVOIRS; FLUID MECHANICS; EXPERIMENTAL DATA

Citation Formats

Seright, R.S., Liang, J.T., Schrader, R., Hagstrom, J. II, Liu, J., and Wavrik, K. Improved methods for water shutoff. Final technical progress report, October 1, 1997--September 30, 1998. United States: N. p., 1998. Web. doi:10.2172/296688.
Seright, R.S., Liang, J.T., Schrader, R., Hagstrom, J. II, Liu, J., & Wavrik, K. Improved methods for water shutoff. Final technical progress report, October 1, 1997--September 30, 1998. United States. doi:10.2172/296688.
Seright, R.S., Liang, J.T., Schrader, R., Hagstrom, J. II, Liu, J., and Wavrik, K. Thu . "Improved methods for water shutoff. Final technical progress report, October 1, 1997--September 30, 1998". United States. doi:10.2172/296688. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/296688.
@article{osti_296688,
title = {Improved methods for water shutoff. Final technical progress report, October 1, 1997--September 30, 1998},
author = {Seright, R.S. and Liang, J.T. and Schrader, R. and Hagstrom, J. II and Liu, J. and Wavrik, K.},
abstractNote = {In the United States, more than 20 billion barrels of salt water are produced each year during oilfield operations. A tremendous economic incentive exists to reduce water production if that can be accomplished without significantly sacrificing hydrocarbon production. This three-year research project had three objectives. The first objective was to identify chemical blocking agents that will (a) during placement, flow readily through fractures without penetrating significantly into porous rock and with screening out or developing excessive pressure gradients and (b) at a predictable and controllable time, become immobile and resistant breakdown upon exposure to moderate to high pressure gradients. The second objective was to identify schemes that optimize placement of the above blocking agents. The third objective was to explain why gels and other chemical blocking agents reduce permeability to one phase (e.g., water) more than that to another phase (e.g., oil or gas). The authors also wanted to identify conditions that maximize this phenomenon. This project consisted of three tasks, each of which addressed one of the above objectives. This report describes work performed during the third and final period of the project. During this three-year project, they: (1) Developed a procedure and software for sizing gelant treatments in hydraulically fractured production wells; (2) Developed a method (based on interwell tracer results) to determine the potential for applying gel treatments in naturally fractured reservoirs; (3) Characterized gel properties during extrusion through fractures; (4) Developed a method to predict gel placement in naturally fractured reservoirs; (5) Made progress in elucidating the mechanism for why some gels can reduce permeability to water more than that to oil; (6) Demonstrated the limitations of using water/oil ratio diagnostic plots to distinguish between channeling and coning; and (7) Proposed a philosophy for diagnosing and attacking water-production problems.},
doi = {10.2172/296688},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 1998},
month = {Thu Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 1998}
}

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