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Title: The Internet information infrastructure: Terrorist tool or architecture for information defense?

Abstract

The Internet is a culmination of information age technologies and an agent of change. As with any infrastructure, dependency upon the so-called global information infrastructure creates vulnerabilities. Moreover, unlike physical infrastructures, the Internet is a multi-use technology. While information technologies, such as the Internet, can be utilized as a tool of terror, these same technologies can facilitate the implementation of solutions to mitigate the threat. In this vein, this paper analyzes the multifaceted nature of the Internet information infrastructure and argues that policymakers should concentrate on the solutions it provides rather than the vulnerabilities it creates. Minimizing risks and realizing possibilities in the information age will require institutional activities that translate, exploit and convert information technologies into positive solutions. What follows is a discussion of the Internet information infrastructure as it relates to increasing vulnerabilities and positive potential. The following four applications of the Internet will be addressed: as the infrastructure for information competence; as a terrorist tool; as the terrorist`s target; and as an architecture for rapid response.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Aquila Technologies Group, Albuquerque, NM (United States)
  2. Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
296635
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-98-1348; CONF-980489-
ON: DE99000670; TRN: AHC29903%%33
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 8. annual international arms control conference, Albuquerque, NM (United States), 3-5 Apr 1998; Other Information: PBD: [1998]
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 MATHEMATICS, COMPUTERS, INFORMATION SCIENCE, MANAGEMENT, LAW, MISCELLANEOUS; INTERNET; VULNERABILITY; USES; SABOTAGE; MITIGATION; INFORMATION DISSEMINATION

Citation Formats

Kadner, S., Turpen, E., and Rees, B. The Internet information infrastructure: Terrorist tool or architecture for information defense?. United States: N. p., 1998. Web.
Kadner, S., Turpen, E., & Rees, B. The Internet information infrastructure: Terrorist tool or architecture for information defense?. United States.
Kadner, S., Turpen, E., and Rees, B. Tue . "The Internet information infrastructure: Terrorist tool or architecture for information defense?". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/296635.
@article{osti_296635,
title = {The Internet information infrastructure: Terrorist tool or architecture for information defense?},
author = {Kadner, S. and Turpen, E. and Rees, B.},
abstractNote = {The Internet is a culmination of information age technologies and an agent of change. As with any infrastructure, dependency upon the so-called global information infrastructure creates vulnerabilities. Moreover, unlike physical infrastructures, the Internet is a multi-use technology. While information technologies, such as the Internet, can be utilized as a tool of terror, these same technologies can facilitate the implementation of solutions to mitigate the threat. In this vein, this paper analyzes the multifaceted nature of the Internet information infrastructure and argues that policymakers should concentrate on the solutions it provides rather than the vulnerabilities it creates. Minimizing risks and realizing possibilities in the information age will require institutional activities that translate, exploit and convert information technologies into positive solutions. What follows is a discussion of the Internet information infrastructure as it relates to increasing vulnerabilities and positive potential. The following four applications of the Internet will be addressed: as the infrastructure for information competence; as a terrorist tool; as the terrorist`s target; and as an architecture for rapid response.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 1998},
month = {Tue Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 1998}
}

Conference:
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