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Title: Research opportunities from emerging atmospheric observing and modeling capabilities

Abstract

The Second Prospectus Development Team (PDT-2) of the U.S. Weather Research Program was charged with identifying research opportunities that are best matched to emerging operational and experimental measurement and modeling methods. The overarching recommendation of PDT-2 is that inputs for weather forecast models can best be obtained through the use of composite observing systems together with adaptive (or targeted) observing strategies employing both in situ and remote sensing. Optimal observing systems and strategies are best determined through a three-part process: observing system simulation experiments, pilot field measurement programs, and model-assisted data sensitivity experiments. Furthermore, the mesoscale research community needs easy and timely access to the new operational and research datasets in a form that can readily be reformatted into existing software packages for analysis and display. The value of these data is diminished to the extent that they remain inaccessible. The composite observing system of the future must combine synoptic observations, routine mobile observations, and targeted observations, as the current or forecast situation dictates. Adaptive sampling strategies are designed to improve large-scale and regional weather prediction but they will also improve diagnosis and prediction of flash flooding, air pollution, forest fire management, and other environmental emergencies. Data sensitivity tests andmore » observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) are important tools for gauging the benefit of existing or proposed observing systems. OSSEs involve only model predictions and are essentially self-contained. There is a pressing need to better understand the interaction of moist convection with large-scale flow. Further improvements in numerical weather prediction demand improved monitoring of Earth surface characteristics so that spatial and temporal variations in air-surface fluxes are realistically simulated. 25 refs., 1 tab.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
285086
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 77; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: PBD: Feb 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; EARTH ATMOSPHERE; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; REMOTE SENSING; CLIMATE MODELS

Citation Formats

Dabberdt, W.F., and Schlatter, T.W. Research opportunities from emerging atmospheric observing and modeling capabilities. United States: N. p., 1996. Web. doi:10.1175/1520-0477(1996)077<0305:ROFEAO>2.0.CO;2.
Dabberdt, W.F., & Schlatter, T.W. Research opportunities from emerging atmospheric observing and modeling capabilities. United States. doi:10.1175/1520-0477(1996)077<0305:ROFEAO>2.0.CO;2.
Dabberdt, W.F., and Schlatter, T.W. Thu . "Research opportunities from emerging atmospheric observing and modeling capabilities". United States. doi:10.1175/1520-0477(1996)077<0305:ROFEAO>2.0.CO;2.
@article{osti_285086,
title = {Research opportunities from emerging atmospheric observing and modeling capabilities},
author = {Dabberdt, W.F. and Schlatter, T.W.},
abstractNote = {The Second Prospectus Development Team (PDT-2) of the U.S. Weather Research Program was charged with identifying research opportunities that are best matched to emerging operational and experimental measurement and modeling methods. The overarching recommendation of PDT-2 is that inputs for weather forecast models can best be obtained through the use of composite observing systems together with adaptive (or targeted) observing strategies employing both in situ and remote sensing. Optimal observing systems and strategies are best determined through a three-part process: observing system simulation experiments, pilot field measurement programs, and model-assisted data sensitivity experiments. Furthermore, the mesoscale research community needs easy and timely access to the new operational and research datasets in a form that can readily be reformatted into existing software packages for analysis and display. The value of these data is diminished to the extent that they remain inaccessible. The composite observing system of the future must combine synoptic observations, routine mobile observations, and targeted observations, as the current or forecast situation dictates. Adaptive sampling strategies are designed to improve large-scale and regional weather prediction but they will also improve diagnosis and prediction of flash flooding, air pollution, forest fire management, and other environmental emergencies. Data sensitivity tests and observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) are important tools for gauging the benefit of existing or proposed observing systems. OSSEs involve only model predictions and are essentially self-contained. There is a pressing need to better understand the interaction of moist convection with large-scale flow. Further improvements in numerical weather prediction demand improved monitoring of Earth surface characteristics so that spatial and temporal variations in air-surface fluxes are realistically simulated. 25 refs., 1 tab.},
doi = {10.1175/1520-0477(1996)077<0305:ROFEAO>2.0.CO;2},
journal = {Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society},
number = 2,
volume = 77,
place = {United States},
year = {1996},
month = {2}
}