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Title: Primate polonium metabolic models and their use in estimation of systemic radiation doses from bioassay data. Final report

Abstract

A Polonium metabolic model was derived and incorporated into a Fortran algorithm which estimates the systemic radiation dose from {sup 210}Po when applied to occupational urine bioassay data. The significance of the doses estimated are examined by defining the degree of uncertainty attached to them through comprehensive statistical testing procedures. Many parameters necessary for dosimetry calculations (such as organ partition coefficients and excretion fractions), were evaluated from metabolic studies of {sup 210}Po in non-human primates. Two tamarins and six baboons were injected intravenously with {sup 210}Po citrate. Excreta and blood samples were collected. Five of the baboons were sacrificed at times ranging from 1 day to 3 months post exposure. Complete necropsies were performed and all excreta and the majority of all skeletal and tissue samples were analyzed radiochemically for their {sup 210}Po content. The {sup 210}Po excretion rate in the baboon was more rapid than in the tamarin. The biological half-time of {sup 210}Po excretion in the baboon was approximately 15 days while in the tamarin, the {sup 210}Po excretion rate was in close agreement with the 50 day biological half-time predicted by ICRP 30. Excretion fractions of {sup 210}Po in the non-human primates were found to be markedlymore » different from data reported elsewhere in other species, including man. A thorough review of the Po urinalysis procedure showed that significant recovery losses resulted when metabolized {sup 210}Po was deposited out of raw urine. Polonium-210 was found throughout the soft tissues of the baboon but not with the partition coefficients for liver, kidneys, and spleen that are predicted by the ICRP 30 metabolic model. A fractional distribution of 0.29 for liver, 0.07 for kidneys, and 0.006 for spleen was determined. Retention times for {sup 210}Po in tissues are described by single exponential functions with biological half-times ranging from 15 to 50 days.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. New York Univ. Medical Center, Tuxedo, NY (United States). Dept. of Environmental Medicine
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
EG and G Mound Applied Technologies, Miamisburg, OH (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
283755
Report Number(s):
MLM-MU-89-65-0010
ON: DE96013865
DOE Contract Number:  
AC04-76DP00053
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 15 Mar 1989
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; PRIMATES; DOSIMETRY; POLONIUM; RETENTION; QUALITATIVE CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; URINE; URINARY TRACT; EXCRETION; POLONIUM 210; TRACER TECHNIQUES; DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES; RADIATION PROTECTION; BABOONS; TISSUE DISTRIBUTION; LIVER; KIDNEYS; SPLEEN; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS

Citation Formats

Cohen, N. Primate polonium metabolic models and their use in estimation of systemic radiation doses from bioassay data. Final report. United States: N. p., 1989. Web. doi:10.2172/283755.
Cohen, N. Primate polonium metabolic models and their use in estimation of systemic radiation doses from bioassay data. Final report. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/283755
Cohen, N. Wed . "Primate polonium metabolic models and their use in estimation of systemic radiation doses from bioassay data. Final report". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/283755. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/283755.
@article{osti_283755,
title = {Primate polonium metabolic models and their use in estimation of systemic radiation doses from bioassay data. Final report},
author = {Cohen, N},
abstractNote = {A Polonium metabolic model was derived and incorporated into a Fortran algorithm which estimates the systemic radiation dose from {sup 210}Po when applied to occupational urine bioassay data. The significance of the doses estimated are examined by defining the degree of uncertainty attached to them through comprehensive statistical testing procedures. Many parameters necessary for dosimetry calculations (such as organ partition coefficients and excretion fractions), were evaluated from metabolic studies of {sup 210}Po in non-human primates. Two tamarins and six baboons were injected intravenously with {sup 210}Po citrate. Excreta and blood samples were collected. Five of the baboons were sacrificed at times ranging from 1 day to 3 months post exposure. Complete necropsies were performed and all excreta and the majority of all skeletal and tissue samples were analyzed radiochemically for their {sup 210}Po content. The {sup 210}Po excretion rate in the baboon was more rapid than in the tamarin. The biological half-time of {sup 210}Po excretion in the baboon was approximately 15 days while in the tamarin, the {sup 210}Po excretion rate was in close agreement with the 50 day biological half-time predicted by ICRP 30. Excretion fractions of {sup 210}Po in the non-human primates were found to be markedly different from data reported elsewhere in other species, including man. A thorough review of the Po urinalysis procedure showed that significant recovery losses resulted when metabolized {sup 210}Po was deposited out of raw urine. Polonium-210 was found throughout the soft tissues of the baboon but not with the partition coefficients for liver, kidneys, and spleen that are predicted by the ICRP 30 metabolic model. A fractional distribution of 0.29 for liver, 0.07 for kidneys, and 0.006 for spleen was determined. Retention times for {sup 210}Po in tissues are described by single exponential functions with biological half-times ranging from 15 to 50 days.},
doi = {10.2172/283755},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/283755}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1989},
month = {3}
}