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Title: How well do we (and will we) know solar neutrino fluxes and oscillation parameters?

Abstract

Individual neutrino fluxes are not well determined by the four operating solar neutrino experiments. Assuming neutrino oscillations occur, the {ital pp} electron neutrino flux is uncertain by a factor of 2, the {sup 8}B flux by a factor of 5, and the {sup 7}Be flux by a factor of 45. For matter-enhanced oscillation (MSW) solutions, the range of allowed differences of squared neutrino masses, {Delta}{ital m}{sup 2}, varies between 4{times}10{sup {minus}6} eV{sup 2} and 1{times}10{sup {minus}4} eV{sup 2}, while 4{times}10{sup {minus}3}{le}sin{sup 2}2{theta}{le}1.5{times}10{sup {minus}2} or 0.5{le}sin{sup 2}2{theta}{le}0.9. For vacuum oscillations, {Delta}{ital m}{sup 2} varies between 5{times}10{sup {minus}11} eV{sup 2} and 1{times}10{sup {minus}10} eV{sup 2}, while 0.7{le}sin{sup 2}2{theta}{le}1.0. The inferred ranges of neutrino parameters depend only weakly on which standard solar model is used. Calculations of the expected results of future solar neutrino experiments (SuperKamiokande, SNO, BOREXINO, ICARUS, HELLAZ, and HERON) are used to illustrate the extent to which these experiments will restrict the range of the allowed neutrino mixing parameters. For example, the double ratio (observed ratio divided by standard model ratio) of neutral current to charged current event rates to be measured in the SNO experiment varies, at 95{percent} confidence limit, over the range 1.0 (no oscillations into active neutrinos),more » 3.1{sub {minus}1.3}{sup +1.8} (small mixing angle MSW), 4.4{sub {minus}1.4}{sup +2.0} (large mixing angle MSW), and 5.2{sub {minus}2.9}{sup +5.6} (vacuum oscillations). We present an improved formulation of the {open_quote}{open_quote}luminosity constraint{close_quote}{close_quote} and show that at 95{percent} confidence limit, this constraint establishes the best available limits on the rate of creation of {ital pp} neutrinos in the solar interior and provides the best upper limit to the {sup 7}Be neutrino flux. (Abstract Truncated)« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
282181
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Physical Review, D
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 53; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: PBD: Apr 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
66 PHYSICS; SOLAR NEUTRINOS; COSMIC RAY FLUX; NEUTRINO OSCILLATION; BORON 8; MASS; ELECTRON NEUTRINOS; LUMINOSITY

Citation Formats

Bahcall, J N, and Krastev, P I. How well do we (and will we) know solar neutrino fluxes and oscillation parameters?. United States: N. p., 1996. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.53.4211.
Bahcall, J N, & Krastev, P I. How well do we (and will we) know solar neutrino fluxes and oscillation parameters?. United States. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevD.53.4211
Bahcall, J N, and Krastev, P I. Mon . "How well do we (and will we) know solar neutrino fluxes and oscillation parameters?". United States. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevD.53.4211.
@article{osti_282181,
title = {How well do we (and will we) know solar neutrino fluxes and oscillation parameters?},
author = {Bahcall, J N and Krastev, P I},
abstractNote = {Individual neutrino fluxes are not well determined by the four operating solar neutrino experiments. Assuming neutrino oscillations occur, the {ital pp} electron neutrino flux is uncertain by a factor of 2, the {sup 8}B flux by a factor of 5, and the {sup 7}Be flux by a factor of 45. For matter-enhanced oscillation (MSW) solutions, the range of allowed differences of squared neutrino masses, {Delta}{ital m}{sup 2}, varies between 4{times}10{sup {minus}6} eV{sup 2} and 1{times}10{sup {minus}4} eV{sup 2}, while 4{times}10{sup {minus}3}{le}sin{sup 2}2{theta}{le}1.5{times}10{sup {minus}2} or 0.5{le}sin{sup 2}2{theta}{le}0.9. For vacuum oscillations, {Delta}{ital m}{sup 2} varies between 5{times}10{sup {minus}11} eV{sup 2} and 1{times}10{sup {minus}10} eV{sup 2}, while 0.7{le}sin{sup 2}2{theta}{le}1.0. The inferred ranges of neutrino parameters depend only weakly on which standard solar model is used. Calculations of the expected results of future solar neutrino experiments (SuperKamiokande, SNO, BOREXINO, ICARUS, HELLAZ, and HERON) are used to illustrate the extent to which these experiments will restrict the range of the allowed neutrino mixing parameters. For example, the double ratio (observed ratio divided by standard model ratio) of neutral current to charged current event rates to be measured in the SNO experiment varies, at 95{percent} confidence limit, over the range 1.0 (no oscillations into active neutrinos), 3.1{sub {minus}1.3}{sup +1.8} (small mixing angle MSW), 4.4{sub {minus}1.4}{sup +2.0} (large mixing angle MSW), and 5.2{sub {minus}2.9}{sup +5.6} (vacuum oscillations). We present an improved formulation of the {open_quote}{open_quote}luminosity constraint{close_quote}{close_quote} and show that at 95{percent} confidence limit, this constraint establishes the best available limits on the rate of creation of {ital pp} neutrinos in the solar interior and provides the best upper limit to the {sup 7}Be neutrino flux. (Abstract Truncated)},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevD.53.4211},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/282181}, journal = {Physical Review, D},
number = 8,
volume = 53,
place = {United States},
year = {1996},
month = {4}
}